Navigation path

Share on 
	Share on Facebook
  
	Tweet it
  
	Share on google+
  
	Share on linkedIn
  
    E-mail

Unemployment and benefits

Updated : 20/06/2014

work

Where am I covered?

Which country you're covered in depends on 2 factors:

  • your work situation (employed, self-employed, unemployed, posted abroad, working across the border from where you live, and so on)
  • your country of residence - not your nationality.

You may not choose which country you will be covered by.

When working or living abroad, you will have social security cover in either your home country or the host country. In either case, you'll need to make arrangements to make sure you stay covered after you move to your new country.

To avoid potentially serious problems and misunderstandings, find out about social security in your host country.

What to do if you are:

Living and working abroad

As a migrant worker in the EU - employed or self-employed - you should register with the social security system in your host country.

 

You and your dependents will then be covered by that country's social security system. Your benefits related to sickness, family, unemployment, pensions, occupational accidents and diseases, early retirement and death will be determined by the local laws.

Qualifying periods

In many countries, the benefits you're entitled to may depend on how long you've previously paid contributions for.

The country where you claim benefits must take into account all the periods you've worked or paid contributions in other EU countries as if you'd been covered in that country all along.

If it fails to do so, contact our assistance services for help.

Sample story

Every period of work in the EU counts for benefits

Ana from Poland worked 6 years in Poland and then moved to Germany, where she worked for 2 years.

She then had a car accident which left her unable to walk, so she applied for an invalidity pension in both Poland and Germany.

The German authorities dismissed her application because she'd worked there for less than 5 years (the minimum period to qualify for a German invalidity pension).

However, in calculating Ana's working years, the authorities should have included the time she'd worked in Poland. This would have brought the figure to 8 years, well over the German minimum for qualifying.

So Ana was actually entitled to an invalidity pension from both Germany and Poland — each country paying a share proportionate to the years Ana had worked there.

Posted abroad on a short assignment (<2 years)

As an EU national, you can work temporarily in another EU country and still remain covered by your home social security system, that is the system of the country where you usually work.

Being posted to another EU country - whether you are an employee or self-employed - has no impact on your (or your family's) social security rights (health cover, family allowance, disability or old-age pension, etc.).

Moving abroad for the duration of the posting?

  • Ask the healthcare authorities in your home country for an S1 form (formerly E 106).

    This document proves you and your family are entitled to healthcare during your stay.

  • Give the S1 form to the host country's healthcare authorities on arrival.

Just making short visits?

All you need is a European health insurance card. You can get one from your healthcare provider or the social security authorities in your home country.

Had an accident at work?

You should receive:

  • medical treatment - locally (in the host country)
  • income replacement for any time off from work - from your home country.

A civil servant seconded abroad

If you're a civil servant seconded to work in another EU country (at an embassy, consulate or other official institution abroad), you'll be covered by the social security system of your home country.

This means your benefits related to sickness, family, pensions, occupational accidents and diseases, early retirement and death will be determined according to your home country's laws.

A different set of rules applies if you become unemployed while on secondment.

Working in one country, living in another (cross-border commuter)

As a cross-border commuter - employed or self-employed:

  • You pay social security contributions and are covered in the EU country where you work
  • You can, however, obtain medical treatment in the country where you live.
  • If you lose your job, you should apply for benefits in the country where you live.

This is a complex area and each area of social security (healthcare, unemployment, pensions, family benefits, etc.) has its own set of rules.

Sample story

Social security contributions - paid only in the country where you work

Balázs used to live in Hungary and work in Austria. During that time, he paid his contributions in Austria. However, the Hungarian authorities are now claiming he should have paid contributions in Hungary.

Cross-border commuters in the EU are covered under one national social security system only — in their country where they work. The Hungarian authorities' claim is wrong.

Working in more than one country

The basic rule is that if you work in more than one EU country but do a substantial part of your work ( at least 25%), in your country of residence, you'll be covered by the laws of your country of residence.

Special cases

If you...

Country where you're covered

Work less than 25% of the time in your country of residence

Where your employer's head office or business is located

Work for several employers whose head offices are in different countries

Your country of residence

Are self-employed and do less than a substantial part of your work in your country of residence

Where you do most of your work

Have a job in one country and do self-employed work in another

Where you have a job

Looking for work

Receiving unemployment benefit?

If you're receiving this benefit from the EU country where you became unemployed, going abroad to look for work won't affect your (or your family's) rights to health cover, family allowance, invalidity or old age pension rights, etc.

To ensure that you and your family have health cover during a temporary stay abroad, don't forget to get a European Health Insurance Card.

Once you've found a job, various social security rules may apply.

Check the rules for your country

Not receiving unemployment benefit?

If you're not receiving benefit and want to look for work in another EU country, you'll be entitled to social security cover (health cover, family allowance, etc…) in your country of residence.

The social security authorities determine your country of residence with the help of a list of criteria including:

  • duration of stay
  • family status and ties
  • housing situation
  • place of professional or non-profit activity
  • nature of professional activity
  • where you reside for tax purposes.

Even if you're not able to support yourself and your family, you can't be forced to leave your new country if you can prove you're still looking for a job and have a good chance of finding one.

So be sure to keep copies of:

  • your job applications
  • any invitations for interview
  • any other replies you receive.

EU law doesn't oblige your new country to grant income support or any other kind of welfare assistance to jobseekers looking for a job for the first time in that country.

Sample story

Check whether you're entitled to income support as a jobseeker in your new country

Björn from Germany had been receiving his German unemployment benefits in Belgium. When his U2 form (formerly E 303 form) expired, Björn decided to stay on in Belgium and apply for unemployment benefits there.

The Belgian authorities turned down his application. Under Belgian law, Björn wasn't entitled to unemployment benefits in Belgium, as he'd never worked there.

You have no automatic right under EU law to income support (or any other kind of assistance) as a first-time jobseeker in another EU country. But you might be entitled under national rules - it's always worth checking with the local authorities.

Still need help?

Still need help?

Haven't found the information you need? Do you have a problem to solve?

Get advice on your EU rights

Solve problems with a public body

Footnote

This is the country where you usually live or where your 'centre of interest' is located

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

or a national of Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway or Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.

In this case, the 28 EU member states + Iceland, Norway, Liechtenstein and Switzerland

Retour au texte en cours.