#EURegionsWeek

Governing local heritage together

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Thu 15, October 2020
09:30 - 11:00 CET
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Participatory governance in cultural heritage is about inclusive and people-centred approaches that involve the public sector, private stakeholders and civil society in co-designing cultural heritage policies and activities and share their management, for the benefit of communities and as a resource for innovation and territorial development.

In this workshop, we will explore how cities and regions foster participatory governance and civic engagement in cultural heritage, based on lessons learned from the Cultural Heritage in Action project. 

Cultural Heritage in Action is the new EU-funded peer-learning scheme on cultural heritage for cities and regions and is implemented by the workshop co-organisers Cultural Heritage in Action

Draft agenda of the workshop: 

  • Introduction by the moderator (J. Hervé EUROCITIES)
  • European policy context and support activities for cities and regions on cultural heritage (M. Hofman DG EAC)
  • Local policy trends to foster participatory governance in cultural heritage (A. LeGall KEA)
  • Presentations of two initiatives featured in the Cultural Heritage in Action catalogue of good practices 
    • Commonlands: cultural community mapping in Alpine areas, Stefania Cerutti, PhD, Associate Professor in economic and political geography, Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)
    • Discovering 300 years of history between four walls: 14 Henrietta Street in Dublin, Speaker from the Dublin City Council culture company
  • Q&A with participants
  • Conclusions and information on opportunities to attend peer-learning visits
Tracey Bardon, Visitor Experience Manager, Dublin City Council Culture Company, Ireland.
Iseult Byrne, CEO, Dublin City Council Culture Company, Ireland.
Julie Hervé, Senior policy advisor, EUROCITIES, Belgium.
Iseult Byrne, CEO, Dublin City Council Culture Company, Ireland.
Stefania Cerutti, Professore Associato di Geografia Economico-Politica, Università degli Studi del Piemonte Orientale, Italy.
Julie Hervé, Senior policy advisor, EUROCITIES, Belgium.
Maciej Hofman, Policy officer, Euroepan Commission, DG Education and Culture, Belgium.
Arthur Le Gall, Director, KEA, Belgium.
15WS1171V
Workshop
Cohesion and Cooperation
Architects' Council of Europe (ACE), Errin, Eurocities, Europa Nostra, European Commission, KEA European Affairs
English (EN)
Zoom

Session summary

This session focused on participatory governance approaches to cultural heritage. Such approaches involve the public sector, private stakeholders, civil society and citizens in co-designing policies and programmes, in shared management of those policies and programmes, in enhancing the value of cultural heritage among communities, and in using heritage as a resource for innovation and local and regional development.

 

Local and regional policy trends in fostering participatory governance in cultural heritage:

Key issues faced by cities and regions include:

Sustainable management of cultural heritage and activating places; making sure that the place is meaningful, accessible and user-friendly; solving wicked social issues; job creation (including through local craftsmanship and tourism) and nurturing lively local cultural ecosystems; empowering citizens and local partnerships; and fostering engagement.

What are cities and regions telling us?

  • Cultural heritage is a resource for future local and regional development; it ranks high in the strategic priorities of cities. New working methods are developing for local authorities to join forces with local stakeholders. New local networks of stakeholders are also developing, with local players joining forces.
  • Cultural heritage is a powerful tool to foster social inclusion and acts as a rallying point for different social groups.
  • Adaptive re-use of heritage buildings is not only for cultural new uses.
  • Built heritage areas are being brought back to citizens through new open public spaces.
  • Measuring the various impacts of investing in cultural heritage remains challenging.

Two examples were presented: 

  1. Commonlands: Cultural community mapping in the Alpine area (Italy)
  2. 14 Henrietta Street, Dublin's social history museum

Take away message

  • Investing in cultural heritage is strategic for cities and regions; it supports greater social cohesion and public participation.
  • Cultural heritage creates shared spaces to deal with many other issues at local and regional levels. These shared spaces must be made accessible through participatory processes.
  • See specific examples of participatory governance in cultural heritage in the new Cultural Heritage in Action catalogue: https://bit.ly/36mepyT

Presentations



Cultural heritage is a resource for future local and regional development; it ranks high in the strategic priorities of cities. New working methods are developing for local authorities to join forces with local stakeholders. New local networks of stakeholders are also developing, with local players joining forces.

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