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The European Union (EU) is the largest and most reliable donor to Palestine. Yet many people lack a deep understanding of the context in which the EU’s cooperation with Palestine operates and of the cooperation itself. As the situation in Gaza recently deteriorated, this is becoming of growing relevance. 
Capacity4dev Team created a new Article 26 February 2016
Coordination between the 28 member states of the EU can take time. But what happens when every hour’s delay costs lives? When it comes to natural and man-made emergencies, the EU response begins before a disaster strikes, coordinated by a 21-strong team at the Emergency Response Coordination Centre (ERCC) on Rue de la Loi, Brussels.
“We are now in the fourth year of the Syria crisis and we can see that there is not only a host community fatigue [in Lebanon], but also a donor’s fatigue,” said Emily Jacquard, Director of Search for Common Ground’s Lebanon country office. “We are facing a decrease of funding. Now more than ever, local and international actors need to come together to share resources, knowledge and cross fertilise.”
05
Aug
From
5 August 2016 to 10 June 2017
in (Belgium)
Organised byEuropean Security and Defence College (EEAS/ESDC)

The overall aim of the CSDP High Level Course (HLC) is to prepare selected
senior individuals from EU Member States and EU Institutions for leadership
positions in the application and development of the CSDP policy, crisis
management and capability development, which are able to cooperate
effectively with the various actors in this field. The course aims to broaden
course participants’ knowledge and understanding of the EU security and
defence architecture, the comprehensive nature of the CSDP as a key tool of
CFSP, current and anticipated policy, missions and operations, as well as to
increase their awareness of human rights and gender, freedom security and
justice and horizontal issues.

The training delivered both via the eLearning platform and during the
residential Modules promotes a common European security culture and aims to
foster the network of future leaders involved in the strategic aspects of the
CFSP/CSDP.

“One of the most important messages that I have today is that we need to understand that the life of a conflict is much longer than it seems on the surface. That’s why we have to listen to the first signs. Whether it is a conflict, a disease, or a humanitarian crisis. We pay such a huge price of waiting so long [to act],” said Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations.
One of the many casualties of crises is education. Natural disasters, wars and protracted conflict are disrupting children’s access to schools and contributing to higher drop-out and lower completion rates. Schools can also be destroyed or taken over by military groups, and prolonged conflicts can leave them without trained teachers, resources or funding. In 2015, 80 million children and young people’s education was affected by humanitarian emergencies and protracted crises. 
Development gains are easily undermined by rising extremism in fragile contexts. In response, donors are keen to embed elements of CVE, or ‘combatting violent extremism’, in their cooperation programmes. Engaging young people in the projects is crucial, as it is they who are most at risk of recruitment by extremist groups, and they who can build a peaceful future for their countries.
Emerging from over two decades of conflict and instability, in May 2002 the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste became the 21st century’s first new sovereign state. Since then the country’s government – with assistance from the international community – has worked hard to lay the groundwork for development. In this month’s Views from the Field we hear from both the EU Ambassador to Timor-Leste, Sylvie Tabesse, and Hernâni Coelho, Timor-Leste’s Foreign Minister, as they discuss Timor-Leste’s successes and remaining challenges. 
Julia Walschebauer posted Information 10 April 2018

When the mountain farmers of Timor Leste were faced with a series of devastating droughts and catastrophic floods, they looked to their own cultural traditions to help them survive.

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