Search capacity4dev.eu

Group info
Filter results
43 in total, 1 - 10 shown
actionaid
Domestic resource mobilization is high on the development agenda, and revolves around how developing countries can raise more revenues through their own tax systems and natural resource management. The idea is to create a less aid-dependent, more nationally-accountable, predictable and stable stream of financing for development and poverty eradication.
 When you think about development challenges, a lack of trained accountants might not immediately come to mind. Yet poor public sector financial management is often at the root of patchy service delivery in other sectors, from health and education to transport. South Africa recognised this underlying issue, and with EU support embarked on a capacity development programme.
Zambia can sound like a success. One of sub-Saharan Africa’s fastest-growing economies – with an average annual expansion of 3% between 2004 and 2013 – it was classed by the World Bank as a lower-middle-income country in 2011.
Estimates for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals range up to a $7 trillion a year. Where will it come from? According to two senior experts from the United Nations Environment Programme, the funds are there, and the real question is how they can be channelled from damaging investments towards sustainability.
Capacity4dev Team created a new Article 11 November 2015
The balance of international aid is shifting, with emerging donors contributing a growing proportion of the international development budget. The surge in investment needs careful handling to avoid gaps and overlaps, and to keep poverty reduction and lowering inequality at the heart of aid. Collaborative projects between the EU, emerging donors and beneficiary countries could be the way forward, according to a European Commission report, ‘The European Union, Africa and New Donors’. 
SMEs in developing countries face significant financing challenges due to the lack of appropriately-sized loans available to them. Needs on either end of the spectrum are – relatively – better addressed; large firms have a variety of mechanisms to choose from and grassroots initiatives fill the gap on the microfinancing end. The funding gap for SMEs, however, is estimated by the International Finance Corporation to be at least $2 trillion, with more than 200 million SMEs in need of a loan or overdraft. 
With countries like Myanmar approaching critical points of no return in their economic and social development, financing and support mechanisms must promote sustainable and socially-responsible growth. “We are open for business – but not at all costs,” said Aung Tun Thet, the Economic Advisor to the President of the Republic of the Union of Myanmar, “We will dictate the kind of investment we want.”
Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals will not be limited by an overall lack of money, but rather will depend on “the way finance is mobilised and used”. That’s the message from the European Report on Development 2015, released this week.
In 2014, experts working for the European Commission carried out a synthesis of budget support evaluations from seven different countries. “We have learned that the funds we provide don’t just go into a black hole,” said Jürgen Lovasz, Team Leader for Budget Support in the Evaluation unit at DEVCO. These funds have been used – as intended – to improve people’s livelihoods. 
The Ebola epidemic has taken many lives, breaking up families and leaving numerous children parentless. But it has also left its mark on the economies of affected countries. In Sierra Leone it has more or less ‘destroyed’ the economy, disrupting all key sectors including agriculture, mining and tourism. Donor support has been too slow to arrive and has not ‘kept pace’ with the disease, according to Alimamy Bangura, Director of the Economic Policy and Research Unit at Sierra Leone’s Ministry of Finance.

Pages