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Ending hunger and malnutrition by 2030 will require approaches that go beyond targeting only stunting and wasting – agreed the participants of the Nutrition Seminar organised in March by the European Commission in Brussels.
Health clinic in Nigeria
Each year, nearly 100 million people find themselves pushed into extreme poverty because of health-related expenditures. Capacity4dev spoke to health programme managers at the EU Delegations to Nigeria, Ethiopia, South Africa and Timor-Leste to find out what each country is doing to address the issue, and how the EU is supporting these processes.
EU support for UHC
In the second part of our series on Universal Health Coverage, we look at how the EU is supporting partner countries achieve UHC, through mechanisms like the IHP for UHC 2030, the UHC Partnership, and the SPHIP programme.
psychiatrist and patient
Depression affects over 300 million people around the world, the majority in lower and middle-income countries. Living in poverty exposes people to a barrage of risk factors for mental illness, and it’s a vicious cycle: people suffering from mental ill-health have a harder time accessing services, securing employment and getting out of poverty. The impact goes far beyond the individual sufferer. In this Voices & Views we look at how development partners can support the integration of mental health in healthcare systems.
Development projects and programmes aim to change lives around the world using various methods from technical assistance to capacity development. But what actually happens when a project ends and the money is withdrawn from one day to the next? What legacy does the EU leave behind? Dr Ramneek Ahluwalia, Country Director and Head of the Higher Education and Training HIV/AIDS (HEAIDS) Programme in South Africa shares his experiences, including how he overcame financial cutbacks and near collapse, to oversee one of South Africa’s best success stories. 
Marie Stopes Zambia's (MSZ) innovative family planning project is coming to an end of its funding (around €750,000) from the European Union. However, MSZ plans to continue delivering family planning services in 2016 in conjunction with other donors, says MSZ Senior Programme Manager Julia Ross.
What is the best way to improve health in developing countries: by targeting (and hopefully eradicating) specific diseases, or by improving national health systems? For Veronique Lorenzo the answer lies in a combination of both. 
Capacity4dev Team created a new Article 3 April 2015
It may seem curious to begin the fourth thematic month of the European Year for Development on Health by talking about roads, but as experience in Ethiopia has shown, improving transport infrastructure can make a big difference to people’s well-being.
Meet Judith Muntahli. She was born in 1977 in Ilenga, a village in the Isoka district of Muchinga Province in the far north of Zambia. She and her husband are subsistence farmers with nine children. During her first pregnancy, Judith (pictured below) was bitten by a snake. But by the time she got to the hospital, infection had set in and her leg had to be amputated. With no access to contraception, Judith carried nine more pregnancies on one leg using crutches. Sadly, her 10th child died when he was a month old. 
The Ebola epidemic has taken many lives, breaking up families and leaving numerous children parentless. But it has also left its mark on the economies of affected countries. In Sierra Leone it has more or less ‘destroyed’ the economy, disrupting all key sectors including agriculture, mining and tourism. Donor support has been too slow to arrive and has not ‘kept pace’ with the disease, according to Alimamy Bangura, Director of the Economic Policy and Research Unit at Sierra Leone’s Ministry of Finance.

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