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One of the many casualties of crises is education. Natural disasters, wars and protracted conflict are disrupting children’s access to schools and contributing to higher drop-out and lower completion rates. Schools can also be destroyed or taken over by military groups, and prolonged conflicts can leave them without trained teachers, resources or funding. In 2015, 80 million children and young people’s education was affected by humanitarian emergencies and protracted crises. 
In 2006 the Government of Bangladesh initiated a major overhaul of Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) in Bangladesh, with support from the European Union. The project, implemented by the International Labour Office (ILO), has achieved a couple of ‘first’s’ in the country’s history: it has produced a National Skill Development Policy, a National Qualifications Framework, and it promotes social inclusion.
Girls and boys attending the EDGE workshop in Bangladesh
Since 2012, the British Council’s EDGE programme has trained 16,000 girls from marginalised communities in Bangladesh, India and Nepal, helping them steer their own future.
Donors are increasingly recognising the importance of Technical and Vocational Education and Training in driving economic and social development. As a result, there is a need for more and new TVET policies and support to training structures through improved international cooperation.
How did decentralisation policies affect Central African Republic's struggling education sector?
Schoolchildren in Nepal
Various forms of private education have emerged in recent years in developing countries. Is this an important contribution to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals or a worrying trend that will disenfranchise the poor?
Education is one of the most fundamental factors in reducing poverty and improving health, gender equality, peace and stability.
Volleyball
Despite important investments, educational outcomes in South Africa still have a long way to go. From programmes targeting early-childhood development to life-skill workshops, we discussed EU involvement in the country with Arno Schaefer, Head of Cooperation at the EU Delegation.
Global aid to education is dropping. After rising steadily in the first decade of the 21st century, aid to education fell by 10 per cent between 2010 and 2012. Yet almost 58 million children remain out of school, with girls particularly affected. The Millennium Development Goal of giving every child basic literacy and numeracy skills by 2015 will not be met.
How is Policy Dialogue put into practice in the education sector in Cambodia? What’s working, what isn’t? How has it been strengthened? And how effective is it, taking the example of dialogue about budget allocation to education?

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