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Zena Mouawad posted Information 5 March 2018

A collection of Voices & Views articles on bridging the humanitarian and development sectors is available on Capacity4dev. This discussion is constantly updated with recently published articles.

Zena Mouawad uploaded a new Document 12 April 2019
Zena Mouawad uploaded a new Document 29 March 2019
Zena Mouawad uploaded a new Document 1 February 2019

SPaN Seminar, Paris, 24 January 2019

Session 8 – Joint Programming and implementation of Social Protection nexus programmes 

Keynote speech 2: Joint programming and implementation in Georgia– a Member State’s perspective, Andrei TRETYAK (Expertise France)

 

Zena Mouawad uploaded a new Document 1 February 2019

SPaN Seminar, Paris, 23 January 2019

Session 6 – SPaN at country level

Iraq: Development humanitarian nexus in Iraq, Mr Atif Khurshid (UNICEF).

Zena Mouawad uploaded a new Document 26 April 2018

Brussels II Conference on 'Supporting the future of Syria and the region': co-chairs declaration

“We are now in the fourth year of the Syria crisis and we can see that there is not only a host community fatigue [in Lebanon], but also a donor’s fatigue,” said Emily Jacquard, Director of Search for Common Ground’s Lebanon country office. “We are facing a decrease of funding. Now more than ever, local and international actors need to come together to share resources, knowledge and cross fertilise.”
“One of the most important messages that I have today is that we need to understand that the life of a conflict is much longer than it seems on the surface. That’s why we have to listen to the first signs. Whether it is a conflict, a disease, or a humanitarian crisis. We pay such a huge price of waiting so long [to act],” said Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations.
One of the many casualties of crises is education. Natural disasters, wars and protracted conflict are disrupting children’s access to schools and contributing to higher drop-out and lower completion rates. Schools can also be destroyed or taken over by military groups, and prolonged conflicts can leave them without trained teachers, resources or funding. In 2015, 80 million children and young people’s education was affected by humanitarian emergencies and protracted crises. 
Development gains are easily undermined by rising extremism in fragile contexts. In response, donors are keen to embed elements of CVE, or ‘combatting violent extremism’, in their cooperation programmes. Engaging young people in the projects is crucial, as it is they who are most at risk of recruitment by extremist groups, and they who can build a peaceful future for their countries.

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