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2.3.1 Social Behaviour Change Communications (SBCC)

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Alessio Lupi16 May 2018

Indicators:

a) GP and LL on using SBCC in IE identified. 

b) Challenges on using in SBCC in IE identified and possible means to overcome challenges identified and analysed.

Data Analysis Methods: Identification of GP and LL on SBCC/Communications for Development (C4D). Analysis of GP and LL to determine adaptability and scalability. Identification of challenges identified during SBCC and C4D development and implementation and determine if/how these were overcome.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

1. Develop a business case for the usefulness of the implementation of labour laws in IE activities. A business case for IE operators would indicate that it can be useful to their business to implement labour laws with their workers.

Reference: Independent Final Evaluation Law-Growth Nexus Phase II, 2014 ILO, Geneva

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2. Place high focus and invest in the development of high quality, well-accepted communications and training materials to raise awareness of the importance of implementing labour laws.

Reference: Independent Final Evaluation Law-Growth Nexus Phase II, 2014 ILO, Geneva

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3. Use innovative means to raise awareness of implementation of labour laws and right to access to decent work of IE workers. Include approaches such as use of mobile phones and radio programming.

4. Include IE workers in awareness raising on improving their labour conditions as this will help contribute to bringing about change. This includes for IE workers who are employed on a daily, part-time or occasional basis such as informal construction workers.

Reference: Independent Final Evaluation Law-Growth Nexus Phase II, 2014 ILO, Geneva

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5. Promote SBCC on the rights of domestic workers, including with workers organisations, to remind them of their obligations to the informal workers.

Reference: Making Decent Work a Reality for Domestic Workers Swedish funding towards Outcome 5, 2014, ILO, Geneva

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6. During project design, baseline analysis and implementation be aware that IE workers (who work for IE operators) may be hesitant to participate in labour law compliance. Determine as much as possible in advance what, if any reticence may exist, why it exists and how this could be addressed to increase their access to decent work conditions.

Reference: Independent Final Evaluation Law-Growth Nexus Phase II, 2014 ILO, Geneva

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7. Note that simple and practical approaches during project implementation can also have an impact on attitude and behaviour change. E.g, a project in Kenya established a savings culture among groups dependent on the IE using a simple piggy bank concept.

Reference: Enterprise Development for Rural Families Programme in Kenya, Final Report, 2014, SIDA, Stockholm

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8. When implementing Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) assessments in baseline and end line studies in IE projects, ensure that they are designed in such a way that real change can be measured over time.

Reference: Women’s Entrepreneurship Development and Gender Equality-Southern Africa, 2012 ILO

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9. Allocate sufficient time to illustrate and talk about socio-cultural issues, even in trainings that are not assumed to address such topics. Addressing socio-cultural issues such as on equality and equity with regard to access to production and markets needs attention.

Reference: Evaluation of the Farmer Field School Approach in the Agriculture Sector Programme Support Phase II, Bangladesh, 2011

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10. When working to change attitudes towards local products/services, take into account the usefulness of aspirational role models to change low-income customers’ behaviour. Stimulate production and supply, without losing sight of the need to improve the demand for products and services. Consider that products made by people dependent on the IE or working in newly formalised companies need clients. In many instances the producers/service providers are part of a population group that may also be potential clients. Lack of sufficient information about the usefulness of such products/services may interfere with purchasing them. Growing local markets among the poor who are close to the producers is useful and should be considered. Keep in mind services such as feminine hygiene products and sanitation.

Reference: From Paper to Practice: Learning from the journeys of inclusive business start-ups, SIDA, 2013

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11. Build local consumers trust in order to orient their savings to fairer and healthier products. In particular, draw upon a precise strategy that could include:

  • Demonstrations
  • Word-of-mouth
  • After-Sale services

Reference: From Paper to Practice: Learning from the journeys of inclusive business start-ups, SIDA, 2013

 

SOURCE: RNSF research - Volume 4.2

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