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McKay, Claudia and Pickens, Mark, 2010, Branchless Banking 2010: Who’s Served? At What Price? What’s Next?, General background document on issues in our research matrix, CGAP, The World Bank, Washington DC.

2.3 DIRECT ACTIONS IN COMMUNITIES

2.3.3. Information Technology (IT) and enhancing of livelihoods of people dependent on the IE

Recommendation3. Be aware in designing IE related projects that using mobile technology can be a good and realistic option for providing technical support to youth and others dependent on the IE. Note that the use of technology and mobile phones has the potential to reduce project costs, for example with regard to micro-finance management. It may also reduce training and mentoring costs since no continuous direct personal physical interaction is required.

Reference:McKay, Claudia and Pickens, Mark, 2010, Branchless Banking 2010: Who’s Served? At What Price? What’s Next?, General background document on issues in our research matrix, CGAP, The World Bank, Washington DC.

Evidence sample: In Ecuador: Freedom from Hunger’s partner cooperatives use smartphones, which field staff take with them during field visits to schools to collect savings directly from the youth.

Kenya: YouthSave partner Postbank developed its SMATA (smata means “the smart one” in Swahili) savings account geared towards 12- to 18-year-olds. Like other Postbank customers, SMATA customers can use Postbank’s mobile banking system, PataCash, to deposit and withdraw money from their account through M-PESA.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: United Nations Capital Development Fund YouthStart’s partner, FINCA DRC, uses school-based agents who use point-of-sale devices for account opening and transactions so that students do not have to leave school premises.

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Valentina Corbucci
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26 June 2018

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