Budget Support virtual training

The Budget Support training has been re-designed to be offered as a virtual classroom. This online event will be delivered over a period of 5 days, divided in 3 sessions of 2.5 hours (15 minutes break included) to guarantee continuous participation. 

Training objectives

  • Understand both the objectives and way of operation of Budget Support, as well as to apply the analytical instruments required for the various phases of the modality.
  • Be acquainted with the reporting requirements during implementation and finalisation of Budget Support operations.
  • Understand the importance of the technical, policy and political dialogues that form part of the Budget Support operations.

Content

The online sessions will cover three broad topics:

  1. Four eligibility criteria and their analysis
  2. Design of a budget support programme including indicator selection
  3. Monitoring, disbursement preparation and policy dialogue

Target audience

The training addresses DEVCO and EU Delegation staff members working in development cooperation. The event will also be open to operational managers from NEAR, ECHO, TRADE, FPI and EEAS subject to availability of places.

 

Upcoming dates:  2-4 September 2020

                             7-9 September 2020

Registrations for the course on DEVCO Academy.

 

Training materials

The training materials are available below. Participants are invited to take time to read the "BS recap file" included in this package of material before the course. This document will only be presented if participants have questions.

 

3 Comments

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"Thank you very much for the question.  We are replying as one of the trainers for your training next week and look forward to meeting you remotely as part of that process. 

We will be touching upon the role of capacity development and technical assistance (TA) next week during Module 2 which covers the design of Budget Support programmes.  

 A key objective of budget support is to help countries take ownership for their decisions and build capacity to successfully implement their national and sectoral development strategies.  In many cases administrative capacity is an inhibitor to implementing policies and programmes, and the EU can provide support in the form of "complementary measures" to help build capacity.  These are generally provided using project modalities - i.e. using the EU procurement and contracting systems rather than the Government systems that will be used for the budget support itself.  For smaller contracts framework agreements, which are quick to apply may be used, but for larger TA programmes full EU contract tendering will be required.  This can be time consuming and resource intensive, and prone to delays.  In most cases Finance and Contracts staff in Delegations are well placed to advise on these processes. 

The starting point is to assess and agree the beneficiaries' needs, which is part of the budget support identification and formulation process.  This should be undertaken in close consultation with the Government.  Keep in mind that TA is generally only successful if the beneficiary is keen to receive it, such support cannot be imposed or it will not be accepted.  Building a shared understanding regarding objectives and the means to achieve those objectives helps to underpin the overall budget support design and implementation. 

It is important to keep in mind that the Government also has access to other sources of TA, and institutions such as the IMF (through its regionally based Technical Assistance Centers (TACs), the multilateral development banks and bilateral donors, including Member States, often provide support.   We should ensure that our TA for capacity building complements that of other development partners. Another source of support comes in the form of other EU funded projects (existing or planned) so it is good practice to seek complementarity.

In terms of the linkages to budget support, there are certain pitfalls to avoid.  It is important to ensure that we do not provide TA that directly links to variable tranche (VT) indicators.  For example, it would be inappropriate to provide support for an IT system needed to monitor performance and provide results on which VT indicators depend.  This is because any delay in providing the system or our TA could be perceived as our fault, not the responsibility of Government. 

From a legal perspective complementary measures linked to budget support are included within the same Financing Agreement, but the FA does not usually include very much detail about the exact nature of what is to be provided.  It therefore retains a degree of flexibility".  

One final point is that TA is used differently in many settings, depending on circumstances and needs.  It is important to recognise that its flexibility is one of the strengths, and every budget support programme (and supporting complementary measures) will differ.  

We hope that this is useful and look forward to discussing further next week.

Kind regards

Mark Watson (and Jerôme Dendure) 

Budget support trainers

It would be very helpful if you would identify any issues that remain unclear after you’ve taken the Budget Support elearning. Are there specific challenges or issues that you would like to raise before the training or do you have any examples that you would like to share? You can post your questions here:

Dear Nicola, dear all, 

My question would be in relation to "capacity":

 

What is a capacity development project? (that MS may implement alongside the EU BS) How does it specifically work? 

Also i understand that Technical Assistance might be built in? What does Technical Assistance cover IN DETAIL? Meaning, how does this work in practical terms? 

 

Many thks, 

 

"Thank you very much for the question.  We are replying as one of the trainers for your training next week and look forward to meeting you remotely as part of that process. 

We will be touching upon the role of capacity development and technical assistance (TA) next week during Module 2 which covers the design of Budget Support programmes.  

 A key objective of budget support is to help countries take ownership for their decisions and build capacity to successfully implement their national and sectoral development strategies.  In many cases administrative capacity is an inhibitor to implementing policies and programmes, and the EU can provide support in the form of "complementary measures" to help build capacity.  These are generally provided using project modalities - i.e. using the EU procurement and contracting systems rather than the Government systems that will be used for the budget support itself.  For smaller contracts framework agreements, which are quick to apply may be used, but for larger TA programmes full EU contract tendering will be required.  This can be time consuming and resource intensive, and prone to delays.  In most cases Finance and Contracts staff in Delegations are well placed to advise on these processes. 

The starting point is to assess and agree the beneficiaries' needs, which is part of the budget support identification and formulation process.  This should be undertaken in close consultation with the Government.  Keep in mind that TA is generally only successful if the beneficiary is keen to receive it, such support cannot be imposed or it will not be accepted.  Building a shared understanding regarding objectives and the means to achieve those objectives helps to underpin the overall budget support design and implementation. 

It is important to keep in mind that the Government also has access to other sources of TA, and institutions such as the IMF (through its regionally based Technical Assistance Centers (TACs), the multilateral development banks and bilateral donors, including Member States, often provide support.   We should ensure that our TA for capacity building complements that of other development partners. Another source of support comes in the form of other EU funded projects (existing or planned) so it is good practice to seek complementarity.

In terms of the linkages to budget support, there are certain pitfalls to avoid.  It is important to ensure that we do not provide TA that directly links to variable tranche (VT) indicators.  For example, it would be inappropriate to provide support for an IT system needed to monitor performance and provide results on which VT indicators depend.  This is because any delay in providing the system or our TA could be perceived as our fault, not the responsibility of Government. 

From a legal perspective complementary measures linked to budget support are included within the same Financing Agreement, but the FA does not usually include very much detail about the exact nature of what is to be provided.  It therefore retains a degree of flexibility".  

One final point is that TA is used differently in many settings, depending on circumstances and needs.  It is important to recognise that its flexibility is one of the strengths, and every budget support programme (and supporting complementary measures) will differ.  

We hope that this is useful and look forward to discussing further next week.

Kind regards

Mark Watson (and Jerôme Dendure) 

Budget support trainers

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last update
4 September 2020

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