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Case Studies: How organisations have been implementing the use of mapping drones in humanitarian contexts

Drones can help obtain high-resolution, up-to-date imagery that may prove vital. Drone imagery has informed projects and interventions ranging from camp management, flood risk reduction, preparing census work, and damage assessments following a disaster. 

Attached is a series of case studies describing the experiences of organizations that have implemented these projects in the past. The information is meant to support humanitarian and development organizations to adopt this technology where relevant. 

The case studies were developed as part of the DG ECHO funded Initiative on Drones in Humanitarian Action implemented by FSD in partnership with the Humanitarian UAV Network, CartONG and Zoi. 

Documents

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

Drones provided high-resolution, up-to-date imagery that was essential to the development of exposure maps and for modeling flood risks in Dar es Salaam.

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

The aims of the project were to provide drone training to locals around Kathmandu and to demonstrate the potential use of drone imagery in disaster response.

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

Heavy floods and landslides in Bosnia Herzegovina shifted minefields and explosive remnants of war (ERW) into inhabited areas.

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

A project employing drones in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan explored how aerial imagery might support recovery and reconstruction activities.

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

The timely availability of aerial imagery of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, combined with existing open source imagery and census data, allowed analysts to determine with precision where assistance was needed.

Denise Seosilo uploaded a new Document 21 April 2016

IOM considers the use of mapping drones a helpful tool to plan shelter units and to monitor the evolution of camps. As a result, IOM has been using drones since 2012 for this purpose.

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Denise Seosilo
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21 April 2016

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