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Zinātne un inovācija

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© fotolia.com - Alexander Raths

Science is also for girls!

Girls are still underrepresented in science, technology and research fields in Europe, even though they do as well as boys in science and maths at school. Don’t let your talent go to waste: science needs girls!

By following a science, technology or engineering path you, as a girl, could be responsible for the next great scientific discovery. To help you figure out your dream science job, the European Commission launched the Science: it’s a Girl Thing! campaign.

 

What’s your place in science?

Take the quiz to find out your scientific dream job. If you want to take a closer look, check out when the Science: it’s a Girl Thing! mobile expo comes to your country. Break the stereotypes and show the world that science really is a girl thing.

By working in science you can improve people’s lives. Can you imagine what it would feel like to protect the environment, put food into people’s hands and combat poverty? With science you can use your imagination and creativity to think about something no one has ever thought about before - think about asking questions and pursuing knowledge

Through its various fields, science can be a great opportunity for your future. A research career can even give you the possibility to travel the world and work with an international team.

 

 

 

Background information

Even though there is a big pool of female talent in Europe and the majority of university graduates are women, the proportion of women in top positions in European science is still very low. Female graduates are severely under-represented in the fields of engineering, manufacturing, construction, science, mathematics and computing. This happens because, even though, boys and girls show the same interest towards scientific subjects at school, a large number of girls drop out of science, engineering and technology to pursue other subjects.