European Youth Portal
Information and opportunities for young people across Europe.

Ring – The most honest street food in Budapest

It looks like a tram and rolls at Deák Square. What’s this? No, it is not the tram but one of the three cars of Budapest Bakering which serves you the most unique and probably the cheapest street food of the city: a delicacy called “ring.”

The expression “street food” doesn’t really have an official definition, so we have to proceed from the meaning of the individual words: it is food bought and consumed on the street. Considering this, the most popular places in Budapest that put themselves into the “street food” category should rather be classified as restaurants where, in some cases, there’s even a waiter coming to your table. In all probability, this goes largely against the original concept, but – thank god – there are unique ideas as well that strengthen the real street food line in the capital. Such a refreshing example is Budapest Bakering which tries to be outstanding in every possible way. 

 

Appearance

 

 

Forget the white tablecloth! The “ring” with its yet odd-sounding name – that the city will certainly learn in a few months’ time – can be bought from cars that look like BKV vehicles pulled by hand or propelled by pedals (these in themselves will make you smile and are worth a picture while you’re eating). For the time being, three cars plod along the roads: the red one reminds us of trolley buses, the blue basically looks like the No. 7 bus, and the yellow one is the reincarnation of the old, classic trams. What’s more, the arrival of a mini metro No.3 and local train has already been promised.

 

 

Cake? Bagel? Sandwich?

 

The ring has been compared by several people to several things during the short time passed since its debut, but the results are always the same: nobody has ever seen, and especially has not eaten a product like this. Although there are similar sandwiches around the world, not a single one of them is comparable to the ring – the first has no filling, the second is not round, and the third is not closed. The product of Budapest Bakering is similar to a bagel because it has a hole in the middle, but it consists of a single, uncut bun, so the contents reveal themselves only after the first bite. 

 

Taste

 

I had a ring stuffed with dried fruit and sausage which was very tasty even if it was the last one on the trolley, so it must had been baked hours ago. Strange as it may seem, the dried apricot perfectly harmonizes with the sausage, although you surely need some sense of adventure to try it. Those preferring a more conservative taste can go for the tomato-parmesan, sheep cottage cheese – green pesto, or the ham – goat cheese combinations as well. And if somebody really wants to experience something extreme, there are the honey – ginger – candied lemon or the spinach – feta versions which will definitely please them.

 

When? Where?

 

Well, it is not easy to give exact answers to these questions when it comes to the cars of Budapest Bakering, but chances are high that from early afternoon until late night you will see them cruise in the city, combat-ready. And by late night we really mean “late night,” so those

who feel like eating something good during/after all those drinks in the Friday party can get hold of a ring for merely 300 Forints – the price of a spritzer.

 

Currently, the little cars can only be seen within the boundaries of the 7th district because this is where Budapest Bakering’s business license is valid, but hopefully we soon may meet them in the neighboring districts as well.

 

If someone wants to know more exactly when and where to find the cars, the ring’s website offers a perfect solution since there you can follow them in real time on a map and find out which road to take to find them. What’s more, we can even ask them to turn into our direction!

 

So, ring is far from being a bad choice: it’s cheap, tasty, and comes straight to you – we could hardly except anything more from a street food caterer.

 

Written by Dániel Szőke.

Translated by Mária Kenesei.

 

Many thanks to Budapest Bakering for the photos.

Published: Wed, 19/08/2015 - 11:05


Tweet Button: 

New!


Info for young people in the western balkans

Need expert help or advice?

Ask us!

Related links