Navigation path

Left navigation

Additional tools

Other available languages: FR

European Commission - Statement

Press statement by Michel Barnier following the fifth round of Article 50 negotiations with the United Kingdom

Brussels, 12 October 2017

Good afternoon to all of you.

Ladies and gentlemen, dear David,

Theresa May's Florence speech has given these negotiations much needed momentum.

We worked constructively this week. We clarified certain points. But without making any great steps forward.

We still have a common goal: the desire to reach an agreement on the UK's withdrawal and to outline our future relationship, when the time comes. From the EU side, this is what President Donald Tusk very clearly said three days ago.

Our negotiations are framed within in this perspective.

We share the same objectives as the UK:

  • To protect the rights of all citizens concerned regarding the consequences of withdrawal.
  • To preserve the peace process in Northern Ireland and cooperation on the island of Ireland.
  • To honour at 28 the commitments taken at 28.

For us, from the EU side, achieving and realising these three big objectives is the condition for engaging in a discussion, as soon as possible, on a new ambitious, long-lasting partnership.

Where are we at the end of this fifth round?

More precisely, on each of the main subjects linked to the UK's withdrawal:

1/ On citizens' rights:

  • We have two common objectives:
  1. That the Withdrawal Agreement has direct effect, which is essential to guarantee the rights of all citizens in the long-term.
  1. That the interpretation of these rights is fully consistent in the European Union and in the United Kingdom.
  • On these points, we will continue to work on the specific instruments and mechanisms which will allow us to translate this into reality. This means for us the role of the European Court of Justice.
  • Furthermore, divergences still exist on the possibility of family reunification and on the exportation of social benefits after Brexit, both of which we want.
  • For us, for example, it is important that any European citizen living in the UK can – in 10 or 15 years' time – bring his/her parents to the UK, as would be the case for British citizens living in the EU.
  • In the same vain, an EU citizen who has worked for 20 years in the UK should be able to move to an EU Member State and still benefit from his/her disability allowance, under the same conditions as British citizens in the EU.
  • Finally, an important point for the Member States of the Union: the UK has informed us of its intention to put in place a simplified procedure which allows citizens to assert their rights. We will study attentively the practical details of this procedure, which should really be simple for citizens.

2/ On Ireland, ladies and gentlemen:

  • This week we advanced on the joint principles on the continuation of the Common Travel Area and  I welcome this.
  • We continued our intensive work on mapping out areas of cooperation that operate on a North South basis on the island of Ireland.
  • There is more work to do in order to build a full picture of the challenges to North-South cooperation resulting from the UK, and therefore Northern Ireland, leaving the EU legal framework.
  • This is necessary in order to identify the solutions.
  • This week, we agreed that the six principles proposed by the EU in September would guide our work on protecting the Good Friday Agreement in all its dimensions.

3/ Finally, on the financial settlement:

  • Theresa May confirmed in her Florence speech that the UK will honour commitments it has made during the period of its membership. This is an important commitment.
  • The UK told us again this week that it still could not clarify these commitments. Therefore, there was no negotiation on this, but we did have technical discussions which were useful, albeit technical.
  • We are, therefore, at a deadlock on this question. This is extremely worrying for European taxpayers and those who benefit from EU policies.

Ladies and gentlemen,

This is my summary of our work on the three main topics this week.

On this basis, and as things stand at present, I am not able to recommend to the European Council next week to open discussions on the future relationship.

I will say before you again that trust is needed between us if this future relationship is to be solid, ambitious and long-lasting. This trust will come with clarity and the respect of all commitments made together.

*

Ladies and gentlemen,

Before concluding, I would like to make just one observation.

At one of our recent press conferences, one of you asked me when the European Union would be "ready to make concessions."

We will not ask the UK to "make concessions". The agreement that we are working towards will not be built on "concessions."

This is not about making "concessions" on the rights of citizens.

This is not about making "concessions" on the peace process in Northern Ireland.

This is not about making "concessions" on the thousands of investment projects and the men and women involved in them in Europe.

In these complex and difficult negotiations, we have shared objectives, we have shared obligations, we have shared duties, and we will only succeed with shared solutions. That is our responsibility.

*

Since Florence, there is a new dynamic. I remain convinced that with political will, decisive progress is within our reach in the coming weeks.

My responsibility as the Commission's negotiator, on behalf of the European Union, and with the trust of President Juncker, is to find the way to make progress, while fully respecting the conditions of the European Council, as agreed unanimously on 29 April – which is my mandate – and in constant dialogue with the European Parliament who has twice voiced its opinion, by a very large majority.

That is my mind-set a couple of days ahead of the next European Council

Thank you.

 

 

***

VERSION AS DELIVERED

***

 

Good afternoon to all of you.

Mesdames et Messieurs, cher David,

Le discours de Theresa May à Florence a donné un élan à cette négociation qui en avait besoin.

Cette semaine, nous avons travaillé dans un esprit constructif. Nous avons clarifié certains points. Pour autant nous n'avons pas fait de grand pas en avant.

Nous avons toujours un horizon commun : la volonté d'aboutir à un accord sur le retrait du Royaume-Uni, un retrait ordonné et de dessiner les contours de notre future relation le moment venu. C'est d'ailleurs de notre côté, du cotê de l'Union ce qu'a dit très clairement il y a trois jours le Président Donald Tusk.

Nous plaçons cette négociation dans cette perspective.

Nous partageons avec le Royaume-Uni les mêmes objectifs :

  • Protéger les droits de tous les citoyens concernés par les conséquences du retrait.
  • Préserver le processus de paix en Irlande du Nord et la coopération sur l'île d'Irlande.
  • Honorer à 28 les engagements pris à 28.

Pour nous, du côté de l'Union, réaliser et concrétiser ces trois grands objectifs, c'est la condition pour engager le plus tôt possible la discussion sur un nouveau partenariat ambitieux et durable entre le Royaume-Uni et l'Union européenne.

Où en sommes-nous, mesdames et messieurs au terme de cette nouvelle semaine et de ce cinquième round ?

Plus précisément, sur chacun des grands sujets liés au retrait du Royaume-Uni.

1/ D'abord sur les droits des citoyens qui sont notre priorité :

  • Nous avons sur ce sujet deux objectifs communs :
  1. Que l'accord de retrait ait un effet direct, ce qui est essentiel pour garantir dans la durée les droits de tous les citoyens.
  1. Que l'interprétation de ces droits soit réellement cohérente entre l'Union et le Royaume-Uni.
  • Sur ces deux points, nous continuons à travailler sur les instruments, les mécanismes précis qui doivent permettre de traduire cette volonté dans les faits. Cela implique pour nous , vous le savez, la Cour de justice de l'Union européenne.
  • Par ailleurs, nous avons toujours des divergences sur la possibilité, que nous souhaitons, du regroupement familial et sur l'exportation des prestations sociales après le Brexit.
  • Il nous semble par exemple, si je veux traduire pour exprimer le point que je viens de faire, il me semble par exemple important que tout citoyen européen résidant au Royaume-Uni puisse, dans 10 ou 15 ans, faire venir ses parents là où il vit, comme cela sera le cas pour les citoyens britanniques dans l'Union.
  • Dans le même esprit, un citoyen européen qui a travaillé pendant une vingtaine d'années au Royaume-Uni devrait pouvoir revenir dans l'un des pays de l'Union avec sa pension d'invalidité, dans les mêmes conditions qui s'appliqueraient aux citoyens britanniques vivant dans l'Union.
  • Enfin, un point important pour nous, pour les Etats membres de l'Union : le Royaume-Uni nous a informés de son intention de mettre en place une procédure simplifiée qui permette aux citoyens concernés de faire valoir leurs droits. Nous étudierons avec beaucoup d'attention les détails pratiques de cette procédure qui doit, je le pense, vraiment être simple pour les citoyens.

2/ On Ireland, ladies and gentlemen:

  • This week we advanced on the joint principles on the continuation of the Common Travel Area and  I welcome this.
  • We continued our intensive work on mapping out areas of cooperation that operate on a North South basis on the island of Ireland.
  • There is more work to do in order to build a full picture of the challenges to North-South cooperation resulting from the UK, and therefore Northern Ireland, leaving the EU legal framework.
  • This is necessary in order to identify the solutions.
  • This week, we agreed that the six principles proposed by the EU in September would guide our work on protecting the Good Friday Agreement in all its dimensions.

3/ Enfin Sur le règlement financier :

  • Dans son discours de Florence, Theresa May a affirmé que le Royaume-Uni honorerait les engagements pris en tant que membre de l'Union et c'est un engagement important.
  • Cette semaine pourtant, le Royaume Uni nous a redit qu'il n'était toujours pas préparé à préciser ces engagements. Il n'y a donc pas eu de négociation sur ce sujet, et nous nous sommes contentés de discussions techniques, utiles, mais techniques.
  • Nous sommes donc sur cette question-là dans une impasse qui est extrêmement préoccupante pour les porteurs de projets, des milliers de porteurs de projet partout en Europe et aussi préoccupante pour les contribuables.

Mesdames et Messieurs,

Je vous ai présenté à l'instant le bilan de nos travaux télégraphiquement sur les trois grands sujets principaux.

Sur cette base, je ne suis pas en mesure, dans l'état actuel des choses, de proposer au Conseil européen la semaine prochaine d'ouvrir les discussions sur la future relation.

Je redis devant vous que cette relation future, pour être solide, ambitieuse, durable, exige entre nous de la confiance. Cette confiance elle viendra avec la clarté et avec le respect de tous les engagements que nous pris ensemble à 28.

*

Avant de conclure, juste une observation.

A l'occasion de précédentes conférences de presse, l'un d'entre vous m'a demandé à quel moment l'Union européenne serait enfin prête à faire des "concessions".

Nous ne demandons pas aux Britanniques de faire des "concessions". L'accord auquel nous travaillons ne se construira pas sur des "concessions".

Il ne s'agit pas de faire des "concessions" sur les droits des citoyens.

Il ne s'agit pas de faire des "concessions" sur le processus de paix en Irlande.

Et Il ne s'agit pour le règlement financier, non plus de faire des "concessions" sur les milliers de projets d'investissement et toutes les femmes et les hommes qui sont derrière ces projets dans toute l'Europe.

Dans cette négociation complexe, difficile, nous avons des objectifs partagés, je les ai rappelés. Nous avons des obligations partagées, nous avons des devoirs partagés et nous ne réussirons qu'avec des solutions partagées. C'est là notre responsabilité.

*

Pour conclure, je le redis, depuis le discours de Florence, il y a une dynamique. Je reste persuadé au moment où je vous parle aujourd'hui qu'avec une volonté politique, des avancées décisives sont à notre portée dans les deux mois qui viennent. Nous allons d'ailleurs avec David Davis fixer plusieurs rendez-vous de négociation d'ici la fin de l'année.

Ma responsabilité comme négociateur, au nom de la Commission de l'Union européenne, avec la confiance du Président Juncker, ma responsabilité c'est de rechercher le chemin de ces avancées, en respectant précisément toutes les conditions que le Conseil européen a établies le 29 avril dernier à l'unanimité. Et c'est là mon mandat que je suivrais scrupuleusement et je le ferai aussi en dialogue constant et également confiant avec le Parlement européen qui s'est exprimé à travers deux résolutions à une très large majorité.

Voilà mon état d'esprit à quelques jours de la prochaine réunion du Conseil européen. Je vous remercie de votre attention.

 

STATEMENT/17/3921


Side Bar