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MEMO/06/236

Brussels, 9 June 2006

Bathing Water: Overview of the situation in Member States

The EU Bathing Water Directive[1]lays down two sets of bathing water quality standards: minimum imperative values, with which compliance is mandatory, and stricter guide values, with which compliance is desirable but not obligatory. Member States are required to monitor the water quality in their designated bathing areas through regular sampling during the season and to report the results to the European Commission.

In the 2005 bathing season the average compliance rate with the mandatory values was 96.1% at coastal bathing areas (96.7% in 2004) and 85.6% at inland (freshwater) sites (89.4% in 2004).

Compliance with the guide values averaged 89.1% at coastal sites (88.5% in 2004) and 63.1% at inland areas (66.4% in 2004).

Average compliance with mandatory values in the ‘old’ EU-15 is 96.7% for coastal areas (13.882 sites) and 91.4% for freshwater areas (5.626 sites). 4 "new" Member States (Hungary, Latvia, Malta and Poland) reported this year for first time, with high percentages of sites insufficiently sampled: 38.9 % of their 180 coastal sites, and 43.4 % of their 731 freshwater sites.

Overall the Member States have removed from the official lists in 2005 and since bathing season 1990, 2984 or 17.2 % of the total number of coastal sites ever listed, and 4331 or 39.3 % of their freshwater sites.

The following summary provides an overview of the situation in individual Member States during the 2005 season.

Austria

Austria reported on 268 freshwater (inland) bathing sites in 2005.

The 2005 bathing season brought a slight decrease in average bathing water quality, interrupting the improving trend observed in the previous year. Compliance with the mandatory values fell by 1.9 percentage points, from 98.9% to 97%.

Compliance with the more stringent guide values was 81.7%, which is in between the rates for 2003 and 2004.

Austria has not removed bathing sites from the official lists since the previous bathing season. The total number of sites withdrawn since the 1996 bathing season remains at 2.2% of the total number of sites ever listed.

No bathing area was insufficiently sampled during the 2005 season.

Belgium

Belgium reported on 40 coastal sites and 73 freshwater sites in 2005.

In coastal areas compliance with the mandatory values dropped by 2.4 percentage points compared with the 2004 bathing season, from 97.4% to 95% in 2005. Compliance with the more stringent guide values, already low at 25.6% in the 2004 season, fell back further to 17.5% in 2005.

Freshwater areas showed a significant quality improvement. The rate of compliance increased by 11.3 percentage points to 84.9% for the mandatory values and by 7.6 points to 47.9% for the guide values.

Bathing was prohibited in 6.8% of the freshwater areas but not at any coastal sites.

The total number of freshwater sites deleted from Belgium’s list of bathing areas covered by the Directive since the 1990 bathing season amounts to 43.8% of the total number of sites ever listed.

Cyprus

Cyprus reported on 100 coastal sites in 2005. This is the second year that Cyprus has provided bathing water quality data.

All bathing areas were well monitored. The bathing water quality was excellent in the 2005 season in all coastal areas, reaching 100% compliance both with mandatory and guide values. This is a significant improvement from the rate of compliance in the previous bathing season, at 86% and 81% respectively.

Bathing was not prohibited anywhere. Cyprus has not removed any bathing sites from the official lists.

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic reported on 176 freshwater sites in 2005. This is the second year that it has reported. .

The high proportion of bathing areas which were not sufficiently sampled during the 2004 season – 31,3% - decreased spectacularly to 8% in 2005.

The percentage of bathing areas complying with the mandatory and guide values was still relatively low, at 67.6% and 43.2% respectively. However, this represents a a marked improvement from 49.4% and 38.6% in 2004.

A negative issue is that the percentage of bathing areas that were non-compliant due to poor water quality increased to 14.2 % from 11.4%. The number of banned areas also rose, from 7.4% to 9.7%.

The Czech Republic has not removed any bathing sites from its list of areas covered by the Directive since it started reporting.

Denmark

Denmark reported on 1146 coastal sites and 112 freshwater bathing areas in 2005.

In coastal bathing areas, compliance with the mandatory values increased very slightly by 0.1 percentage point to 96.9% in 2005. Compliance with the more stringent guide values slipped from 93.0% to 90.8%. The number of areas where bathing was prohibited due to inadequate water quality increased slightly from 0.5% to 0.7%. One coastal bathing area was insufficiently sampled in the 2005 season (0.1%).

In freshwater areas, compliance with the mandatory values in 2005 remained at 96.4%, the same level as the previous season. Compliance with the more stringent guide values fell from 89.3% to 84.8%. Since the 2002 season bathing has been prohibited in about 1.8% of the freshwater areas in Denmark. This situation did not change in 2005.

The total number of coastal sites that Denmark has deleted from its list of areas covered by the Directive since 1991 has increased to 18.3% of the total number of sites ever listed. For freshwater areas the proportion is 20%.

Estonia

Estonia provided data on 34 coastal sites and 38 freshwater sites in 2005, its second year of reporting. The number of coastal and freshwater zones covered and the average bathing water quality increased compared with 2004.

In coastal areas compliance with the mandatory values improved slightly by pectively 1.5 percentage points to 76.5%. There was a similar limited improvement in compliance with the stricter guide values, up 0.7% points to 38.2%. All sites were well monitored.

In freshwater areas the increase in bathing water quality was more significant. Compliance with the mandatory values reached 100%, against 60% in 2004. The percentage of freshwater sites which complied with the more stringent guide values improved from 53.3% to 57.9%.

Bathing was not prohibited in any areas, nor has Estonia removed any bathing sites from the scope of the Directive since it started reporting.

Finland

Finland reported on 99 coastal sites and 280 freshwater areas in 2005.

At coastal bathing sites compliance remained at a high level but fell slightly to 97% from 98.1% in 2004. By contrast, the percentage of coastal areas complying with the guide values rose from 61.2% to 64.6%.

Only one of the monitored bathing areas was insufficiently sampled (1%). Overall, the percentage of bathing areas failing to comply with the mandatory values due to poor water quality was barely changed, at 1.9% against 2% in 2004.

Bathing water quality in freshwater areas also remained high but decreased a little, interrupting the upward trend observed in the previous three years. The percentage of bathing areas complying with the mandatory values slipped from 98.9% in 2004 to 98.2 %, while compliance with the more stringent guide values fell by 2.5 percentage points to 72.9%. The proportion of bathing areas insufficiently sampled was 0.7 % against zero the previous year:

The number of sites that Finland has removed from the scope of the Directive since 1990 amounts to 33.3% of the total number of freshwater areas and 29.8% of the total number of coastal sites ever listed.

France

France reported on 1894 coastal sites and 1328 freshwater sites in 2005. Bathing water quality improved compared with the 2004 season.

In coastal zones compliance with the mandatory values rose by 1.2 percentage points to 96.9%. Compliance with the stricter guide values improved by 5.3 percentage points to 79.2%.. This confirms the positive trend seen since the 2001 season. All areas were sufficiently sampled in 2005. Bathing was not prohibited in any areas.

The results for the freshwater areas also show a positive trend. Compliance with the mandatory values rose by 1.0 percentage point to 95.9% in the 2005 season while compliance with the guide values increased from 58.7% to 62.7%. All areas were sufficiently sampled and none was subject to bathing prohibitions in 2005.

The number of coastal sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive by the French authorities since 1991 is 17.9% of the total number of sites ever listed. For freshwater areas this proportion amounts to 53.6%.

Germany

Germany reported on 388 coastal bathing areas and 1554 freshwater sites in 2005. Average bathing water quality remained high but showed a small decrease compared with the previous season in freshwater areas.

In coastal areas the rate of compliance with the mandatory values reached 99%, up slightly from 98.7% in 2004. There was also a small increase in compliance with the more stringent guide values, from 91.3% to 91.5%. The proportion of coastal sites where bathing was prohibited increased slightly from 0.3% to 0.5%. The percentage of bathing areas that stayed open but failed to comply due to poor water quality fell slightly from 1% in 2004 to 0.5%.

Regarding freshwater areas, there was a small decrease in compliance both with the mandatory values, which fell from 95.1% to 94%, and with the more stringent guide values, down from 83 to 82.1%. The percentage of bathing areas failing to comply due to poor water quality rose slightly, from 3.1% to 3.5%. The proportion that was insufficiently sampled remained the same (0.3%), while the percentage of areas where bathing was prohibited increased from 1.5% to 2.2%.

The proportion of sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive since 1990 amounts to 41.6% of the total number of freshwater sites and 45.8% of the total number of coastal sites ever listed.

Greece

Greece reported on 2006 coastal sites and 4 freshwater areas in 2005. Bathing water quality remained excellent, with 100% compliance with the mandatory values at both types of sites.

Compliance with the more stringent guide values further increased from 97.6% to 98.1% in coastal areas. All coastal sites were open for bathing and were sufficiently monitored.

In the four freshwater areas the 2005 situation exactly matched the previous year, repeating 100% compliance with both the mandatory values and the guide values.

The number of coastal sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive by the Greek authorities since 1990 amounts to 9.2% of the total number of sites ever listed.

Hungary

Hungary reported on 259 freshwater sites in 2005, the first year it has provided data. Over half the areas (55.2%) were considered non-compliant on the grounds that they were not sampled sufficiently frequently. A further 4.2% did not comply because their bathing water did not meet the mandatory standards. In addition, bathing was prohibited in two areas.

The proportion of bathing areas that did comply with the mandatory values was only 39.4%Compliance with the stricter guide values was 26.3%.

Ireland

Ireland reported on 122 coastal sites and 9 freshwater sites in 2005.

In coastal zones compliance with the mandatory values fell from 97.5% to 95.9%). However, there was an increase of 4.1 percentage points, from 87.7ù to 91.8%, in the proportion of sites meeting the more stringent guide values.

All nine freshwater bathing areas complied with the mandatory values. Compliance with the guide values was 77.8%, a decrease of 11.1% compared with the previous season.

No areas had a bathing prohibition or showed insufficient sampling.

Ireland has removed 0.8% of its coastal bathing sites from the scope of the Directive since 1996.

Italy

Italy reported on 4919 coastal sites and 766 freshwater sites in 2005.

In the coastal zones compliance with both the mandatory values and the more stringent guide values decreased slightly from 2004 to 2005. The proportion of sites meeting the mandatory standards fell 0.9 percentage points to 93.8%, while compliance with the guide values slipped0.4% to 91.9%. This confirms the slightly negative trend seen from 2002 to 2004. The number of coastal areas deemed non-compliant due to poor water quality decreased from 0.7% to 0.5%. 0.3% of the areas were not sufficiently sampled (0.4 % in the 2004 season). The bulk of the non-compliance with the mandatory standards was due to bathing being prohibited at 5.2% of coastal sites in 2005, an increase of 1.2 percentage points compared with the previous season.

The results for the freshwater areas show a negative trend. Compliance with the mandatory values slipped by 3.1% to 64.8% in the 2005 season. Compliance with the guide values decreased from 58.3% to 53.7%. The percentage of bathing areas failing to comply with the mandatory values due to poor water quality increased from 0.3% to 0.7%. Only one area (0.1%) was not sufficiently sampled. As with coastal areas, bathing prohibitions accounted for most of the non-compliance: 32.9% of freshwater sites were covered by bans, up from 31.5% in 2004..

The number of coastal sites removed from the scope of the Directive by the Italian authorities since 1990 is 18.4% of the total number of sites ever listed. For freshwater bathing sites the proportion is 23.2%.

Latvia

Latvia reported on 42 coastal sites and 236 freshwater sites in 2005, the first year it has provided data.

In coastal areas 88.1% complied with the mandatory values and 50% with the stricter guide values. One site (2.4%) was not in compliance. Four sites or 9.5% were insufficiently sampled. Bathing was not prohibited in any areas.

Of the freshwater sites, 89% were in compliance with the mandatory values and 53% with the guide values. Of the 11% that did not comply with the mandatory standards, 5.9% had poor water quality, 4.2% were insufficiently frequently sampled and two sites (0.9%) were subject to bathing prohibitions.

Lithuania

Lithuania reported on 15 coastal sites and 56 freshwater areas in 2005, the second year it has reported.

All coastal areas complied with the mandatory values, while53.3% complied with the more stringent guide values. No bathing areas were insufficiently sampled. This is a remarkable improvement compared with the previous bathing season, when 57.1% of sites met the mandatory standards and 21.4% the guide values. As in 2004, no areas had a bathing prohibition.

For freshwater areas compliance with the mandatory values was also high at 98.2%, a significant increase from 58.5% the previous year. This improvement reflected a sharp decrease in both the number of bathing areas insufficiently sampled, from 26.4% to 1.8% and in sites subject to bathing bans, which fell from 11.3% to 0. Compliance with the guide values was 39.3%, up from 26.4% the previous year.

Lithuania has not removed any sites from the scope of the Directive.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg reported on 20 freshwater sites in 2005.

Only 65% of the areas complied with the mandatory standards, the same as in 2004. Of the 35% of sites that did not comply, 20% had poor water quality and 15% were covered by bathing prohibitions. These percentages were also unchanged from 2004. Three sites (15%) have been banned for bathing since 1994.

The rate of compliance with the more stringent guide values fell to 35% from 50% the previous year.

Malta

This is the first year that Malta has reported data on bathing water quality. It provided data on 87 coastal sites.

Compliance was rather low, at 40.2% for the mandatory standards and 33.3% for the stricter guide values. This reflects the fact that almost 60% of the sites were either not sampled properly or had water quality too poor to meet the mandatory values.

The Netherlands

The Netherlands reported on 82 coastal sites and 550 freshwater sites in 2005.

In coastal areas the rate of compliance with the mandatory values reached 100%, which is 2.4% higher than in the 2004 bathing season. The high rate of compliance with the guide values could not be maintained. The value slipped from 93.9% in 2004 to 89.0% in 2005, but is still higher than in earlier years. All coastal areas were sufficiently sampled and were open for bathing.

In the freshwater areas compliance fell slightly. The percentage of sites complying with the mandatory values remained high at 97.8%) but this was marginally lower than the rate of 98.2% in 2004. The 2.2% non-compliance rate was due to inadequate water quality; no bathing prohibitions were in force and all areas were sufficiently sampled. Compliance with the guide values also decreased, to 61.8% from 62.9%.

The number of freshwater sites removed from the scope of the Directive by the Dutch authorities since 1990 amounts to 44.9% of the total number of freshwater sites ever listed. For coastal sites the figure is 38.8%.

Poland

This is the first year that Poland has provided data on water quality in its bathing areas. It reported on 51 coastal sites and 236 freshwater zones.

A large number of coastal areas (39.2%) and freshwater sites (69.5%) and were considered to be insufficiently sampled. This is the main reason why the rate of compliance with the mandatory standards was low.

For coastal areas compliance was 35.3%. In addition to the almost 40% of sites sampled inadequately, a further 15.7% of coastal areas had water quality below the mandatory standards and 9.8% were subject to bathing prohibitions. The proportion of sites meeting the stricter guide values was 15.7%.

For freshwater areas the rate of compliance with the mandatory values was 11.9% and with the guide values .2 %. Compared with the problem of inadequate sampling, the percentage of freshwater areas failing to comply due to poor water quality was relatively low at 4.7 %.

14% of freshwater areas were subject to bathing bans.

Portugal

Portugal reported on 414 coastal sites and 73 freshwater sites in 2005.

In the coastal areas, the rate of compliance with the mandatory values remained high but decreased marginally from 97.8% in 2004 to 97.6%. The 2.4% of non-compliance was due to inadequate water quality. Compliance with the more stringent guide values increased by 4.3 percentage points to 90.8%.

In freshwater zones compliance with the mandatory values also fell, from 97.3% in 2004 to 95.9%. Here too, all non-compliance was due to poor water quality rather than inadequate sampling or bathing bans. By contrast, the rate of compliance with the guide values more than doubled from 21.9% to 45.2%.

All bathing areas were properly sampled and remained open for bathing.

The number of coastal sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive by the Portuguese authorities since 1991 now amounts to 9.2% of the total number of sites ever listed. For freshwater areas the proportion is 18.0%.

Slovakia

Slovakia reported on 39 freshwater sites in 2005, the second year it has provided bathing water quality data.

The results show a significant improvement from the previous year, although more than half of bathing sites still did not comply. Compliance with the mandatory standards increased from 22.4% to 46.2% and with the stricter guide standards from 14.9% to 35.9%.

Of the 53.8% of sites that did not comply with the mandatory standards, 35.9% were insufficiently sampled (up sharply from 16.4% the previous year). Non-compliance due to inadequate water quality The percentage of bathing areas failing to comply with the mandatory values decreased from 31.3% to 10.3%. In 7.7% of the sites bathing was prohibited (17.9% in 2004).

Slovakia has removed 41.8% of their freshwater bathing sites from the official lists since the previous bathing season.

Slovenia

This is the second year that Slovenia has reported on bathing water quality. It provided data on 19 coastal sites and 18 freshwater sites in 2005.

Average bathing water quality in coastal areas is relatively high. The rate of compliance with the mandatory standards rose to 94.7% from 89.5% in 2004). Compliance with the stricter guide values increased from 78.9% to 84.2%. Water quality in one coastal site (5.3%) did not comply with the mandatory and the guide values. As in the 2004 season all areas were sufficiently sampled and none was covered by bathing prohibitions.

In the freshwater zones, however, compliance is relatively low. 50% of bathing areas complied with the mandatory values, a 5.6% decrease compared with 2004. Non-compliance was due entirely to inadequate water quality. All bathing areas were sufficiently sampled and none had bathing bans. The number of areas complying with the guide values increased from 27.8% to 38.9%.

Slovenia has not removed any bathing sites from the scope of the Directive.

Spain

Spain reported on 1825 coastal sites and 165 freshwater sites in 2005.

Bathing water quality in coastal areas remained very high, showing a slight improvement compared with the previous bathing season. Compliance with the mandatory standards increased from 98.9% to 99.1% , and with the more stringent guide values from 89.5% to 92.4%. All coastal bathing areas except one were sufficiently sampled. The number of coastal sites failing to comply due to poor water quality remained unchanged at 0.8%. The number of areas where bathing was prohibited decreased from 4 to 1.

Compliance was also good at freshwater bathing areas, with 96.4% meeting the mandatory standards, up from 94.7% a year earlier.. The proportion of sites that were non-compliant due to inadequate water quality was the same as in 2004 at 1.2%, while the percentage of areas covered by bathing prohibitions fell to 2.4% from 4.1%. The proportion of sites complying with the guide values rose by 1.4 percentage points to 45.5% but is still low.

The number of freshwater sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive by the Spanish authorities since 1990 amounts to 69.2% of the total number of freshwater sites ever listed. For coastal sites the figure is 15.3%.

Sweden

Sweden reported on 382 coastal sites and 413 freshwater sites in 2005. Compliance with the mandatory standards remained high but slipped slightly.

In coastal areas compliance with the mandatory standards dipped to 97.9% from 98.4% as the proportion of sites with below-standard water quality increased from 1.3% in 2004 to 2.1%. All bathing areas were sufficiently sampled and no bathing prohibitions were in force Compliance with the stricter guide values rose to 80.6% from 76.2%.

The same trend is seen in the freshwater areas. Compliance with the mandatory standards was still high but fell slightly from 98.3% to97.6%. The percentage of non-compliance due to poor quality remained unchanged at 0.7%. The percentage of bathing areas with insufficient sampling increased slightly from 1.0% in 2004 to 1.7%. Compliance with the guide values rose from 76.9% to 78.2% in the 2005 bathing season

The number of coastal sites withdrawn from the scope of the Directive by the Swedish authorities since 1995 remains at 29.7% of the total number of sites ever listed. For freshwater bathing sites the figure is 46.6%.

United Kingdom

United Kingdom reported on 565 coastal sites and 11 freshwater sites in 2005.

The results in coastal areas remain good. Compliance with the mandatory values rose by 0.5 percentage points to 98.2% as the proportion of sites with inadequate water quality fell from 2.3% to 1.5%. No coastal bathing areas were insufficiently sampled and no bathing prohibitions were in force. Compliance with the stricter guide values improved by 4.3% percentage points to 83.7%.

The freshwater areas were 100% compliant with the mandatory values. However, compliance with the guide values showed a further decrease, from 36.4 to 27.3%.

The number of coastal sites removed from the scope of the Directive by the British authorities since 1988 remains at 2.1% of the total number of sites ever listed. No freshwater areas have been withdrawn.

Further information

See press release

The Bathing Water Report 2005 is available on the Commission's Bathing Water Quality site:

http://www.ec.europa.eu/environment/water/water-bathing/index_en.html

Annex

NBA
number of bathing sites/areas





CI %
% of bathing sites complying with imperative (mandatory) values





CG %
% of bathing sites complying with guide values





banned %
% of bathing sites where bathing is banned





delisted %
% of bathing sites removed from the scope of the directive compared with previous year



COASTAL
 
Member State
2005

2004


NBA
CI %
CG %
banned %
delisted %
NBA
CI %
CG%
banned %
delisted %
Austria
0
-
-
-

0
-
-
-

Belgium
40
95
17,5
0
0
39
97,4
25,6
0
0
Denmark
1146
96,9
90,8
0,7
0,4
1137
96,8
93
0,5
0,6
Finland
99
97
64,6
0
4,9
103
98,1
61,2
0
1,9
France
1894
96,9
79,2
0
0,4
1872
95,7
73,9
0
1,1
Germany
388
99
91,5
0,5
1
390
98,7
91,3
0,3
2,0
Greece
2006
100
98,1
0
0,1
1965
99,9
97,6
0
0
Ireland
122
95,9
91,8
0
0
122
97,5
87,7
0
0
Italy
4919
93,8
91,9
5,2
1,2
4884
94,7
92,3
4
0,1
Luxembourg
0
-
-
-

0
-
-
-


Netherlands
82
100
89
0
0
82
97,6
93,9
2,4
0
Portugal
414
97,6
90,8
0
0,3
400
97,8
86,5
0
1,6
Spain
1825
99,1
92,4
0,1
1
1826
98,9
89,5
0,2
0,6
Sweden
382
97,9
80,6
0
0
382
98,4
76,2
0
0
United Kingdom
565
98,2
83,7
0
0
562
97,7
79,4
0
0,2











Cyprus
100
100
100
0
0
100
86,0
81
0

Czech Republic
0
-
-
-

0
-
-
-

Estonia
34
76,5
38,2
0
0
8
75,0
37,5
0

Lithuania
15
100
53,3
0
0
14
57,1
21,4
0

Slovakia
0
-
-
-

0
-
-
-

Slovenia
19
94,7
84,2
0
0
19
89,5
78,9
0












Hungary
0
-
-
-






Latvia
42
88,1
50
0






Malta
87
40,2
33,3
0






Poland
51
35,3
15,7
9,8






NBA
number of bathing sites/areas





CI %
% of bathing sites complying with imperative (mandatory) values





CG %
% of bathing sites complying with guide values





banned %
% of bathing sites where bathing is banned





delisted %
% of bathing sites removed from the scope of the directive compared with previous year



FRESHWATER
 
Member State
2005

2004


NBA
CI %
CG %
banned %
delisted%
NBA
CI %
CG %
banned %
delisted %
Austria
268
97
81,7
0
0
267
98,9
83,1
0
0
Belgium
73
84,9
47,9
6,8
0
72
73,6
40,3
8,3
1,4
Denmark
112
96,4
84,8
1,8
0,9
112
96,4
89,3
1,8
3,5
Finland
280
98,2
72,9
0
2,1
285
98,9
75,4
0
2,4
France
1328
95,9
62,7
0
8,1
1406
94,9
58,7
0
2,9
Germany
1554
94
82,1
2,2
1,6
1561
95,1
83
1,5
1,7
Greece
4
100
100
0
0
4
100
100
0
0
Ireland
9
100
77,8
0
0
9
100
88,9
0
0

Italy
766
64,8
53,7
32,9
3,9
779
67,9
58,3
31,5
0,1
Luxembourg
20
65
35
15
0
20
65
50
15
0
Netherlands
550
97,8
61,8
0
1,8
550
98,2
62,9
0,5
3,8
Portugal
73
95,9
45,2
0
0
73
97,3
21,9
0
5,5
Spain
165
96,4
45,5
2,4
2,9
170
94,7
44,1
4,1
2,3
Sweden
413
97,6
78,2
0
0,5
412
98,3
76,9
0
0
United Kingdom
11
100
27,3
0
0
11
100
36,4
0
0











Cyprus
0
-
-
-

0
-
-
-

Czech Republic
176
67,6
43,2
9,7
0
176
49,4
38,6
7,4

Estonia
38
100
57,9
0
0
15
60
53,3
0

Lithuania
56
98,2
39,3
0
3,8
53
58,5
26,4
11,3

Slovakia
39
46,2
35,9
7,7
41,8
67
22,4
14,9
17,9

Slovenia
18
50
38,9
0
0
18
55,6
27,8
0












Hungary
259
39,4
26,3
0,8






Latvia
236
89
53
0,8






Malta
0
-
-
-






Poland
236
11,9
7,2
14







[1] Directive 76/160/EEC concerning the quality of bathing water


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