RSS
Alphabetical index
This page is available in 5 languages

We are migrating the content of this website during the first semester of 2014 into the new EUR-Lex web-portal. We apologise if some content is out of date before the migration. We will publish all updates and corrections in the new version of the portal.

Do you have any questions? Contact us.


Turkey – Transport

Candidate countries conduct negotiations with the European Union (EU) in order to prepare themselves for accession. The accession negotiations cover the adoption and implementation of European legislation (acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

ACT

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

SUMMARY

The 2011 Report identifies progress made on transport matters, except in the railway sector. In the air transport sector, air safety remains compromised by the lack of communication between air traffic control centres in Turkey and the Republic of Cyprus.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission's words)

EU transport legislation aims at improving the functioning of the internal market by promoting safe, efficient and environment- and user-friendly transport services. The transport acquis covers the sectors of road transport, railways, aviation, maritime transport and inland waterways. It covers technical and safety standards, social conditions, the monitoring of state aid and market liberalisation in the context of the internal transport market.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Some progress has been achieved in alignment of the transport sector, except for the railway sector. Alignment in maritime and land transport remains at an advanced level and air transport is following at a slower pace. The lack of communications between air traffic control centres in Turkey and the Republic of Cyprus continues to seriously compromise air safety. In the maritime sector, the Voluntary IMO Member State Audit Scheme is expected to create positive results for becoming a party to international conventions. The implementation capacity is limited, particularly for dangerous goods in land and maritime transport. Turkey has made progress in the area of Trans-European networks, in particular in the TEN transport area. Further efforts are needed as regards reliable transport data. There is also some progress to report in the TEN energy area.

RELATED ACTS

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its 2010 Report, the Commission noted improvements made by Turkey in order to align its legislation with the acquis in the fields of aviation, maritime transport and road transport. The country needed to continue in this direction, particularly with a view to improving rail market opening and safety.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2008 Report noted limited progress, although alignment of legislation had progressed well in the road transport sector. Considerable efforts had still to be made in the area of road safety. Moreover, the country was still not a party to international agreements on air and maritime transport.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1436 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its November 2007 Report, the Commission reported uneven progress. While the road sector was partly in line with the acquis, no progress could be reported in the rail sector. As for the areas of maritime and air transport, Turkey was still not a full party to all relevant international conventions. The question of risks for aviation safety and that of restrictions on the free movement of goods had not yet been resolved.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2006 Report noted that legislative alignment was fairly advanced in the area of road transport, but uneven in the other sectors. Decisions on the structure of the railway sector were still outstanding. In the areas of maritime and air transport, the adoption of international agreements was not complemented by the transposition of the relevant acquis. Turkey had not removed all restrictions on the free movement of goods, including restrictions on the means of transport.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1426 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2005 Report noted the first real progress in aligning legislation and boosting Turkey’s administrative capacities in the transport sector. However, further efforts were needed to transpose and fully implement the acquis. This was particularly true of the rail, air and maritime sectors, in which the competent administrations needed to become more autonomous and effective. Lastly, Turkey needed to lift restrictions on the free circulation of goods affecting certain means of transport.

Commission Report [COM(2004) 656 final – SEC(2004) 1201 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The October 2004 Report noted that alignment of Turkish legislation with the Community transport acquis remained limited. Legislative and institutional reforms were needed to restructure the entire rail sector in line with the acquis. Besides the need for further legislative alignment, due emphasis should be given to the capacity to introduce competent administrations, in particular in the road transport sector.

Commission Report [COM(2003) 676 final – SEC(2003) 1212 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2003 Report indicated that Turkey had made limited progress in transposing the transport acquis. Alignment of the legislation with the Community transport acquis remained very limited, and calls for the adoption of action plans remained unheeded. Legislative alignment with the acquis should start on maritime safety, as well as on road and rail transport.

Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1412 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The October 2002 Report noted that progress had been limited. Turkey needed to focus further efforts on bringing its legislation into line with the Community transport acquis in all transport sectors. However, legislative preparation also needed to be accompanied by the means to implement and enforce the acquis.

Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1756 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2001 Report emphasised that Turkey needed to step up its legislative work considerably to adopt the Community transport acquis.

Commission Report [COM(2000) 713 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its November 2000 Report, the Commission noted that no new legislation transposing the Community transport acquis had been adopted since the last regular report.

Commission Report [COM(1999) 513 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(1998) 711 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Last updated: 30.12.2011

See also

Legal notice | About this site | Search | Contact | Top