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Cooperation Agreement between the EEC and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)

The aim of this Agreement is strengthen relations between the Gulf Cooperation Council and the European Community. The areas of cooperation are the economy, energy, industry, trade, services, agriculture, fisheries, investment, science, technology and the environment. The aim is to strengthen the process of economic development and diversification in GCC countries.

ACTS

Council Decision 89/147/EEC of 20 February 1989 concerning the conclusion of a Cooperation Agreement between the European Economic Community, of the one part, and the countries parties to the Charter of the Cooperation Council for Arab States of the Gulf (the State of the United Arab Emirates, the State of Bahrain, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Sultanate of Oman, the State of Qatar and the State of Kuwait) of the other part.

Cooperation Agreement between the European Economic Community of the one part, and countries parties to the Charter of the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (the State of the United Arab Emirates, the State of Bahrain, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the Sultanate of Oman, the State of Qatar and the State of Kuwait) of the other part.

SUMMARY

The six countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council and the European Community have drawn up a cooperation agreement aimed at strengthening their relations in a contractual and institutional form.

Economic cooperation should be as extensive as possible, not excluding any area. Here, and in the technical field, priorities are to encourage and facilitate:

  • diversification of GCC countries' economies;
  • market research and trade promotion;
  • technology transfer and development, notably by means of joint actions and the protection of patents, trademarks and intellectual property rights;
  • the promotion of stable and balanced links between traders;
  • cooperation on standards and measures;
  • information exchange;
  • training.

In areas of agriculture, the agri-food industry and fisheries, the aims of cooperation are to step up exchanges of information and encourage contacts between companies and research institutions to promote common projects.

In industry, the aim is to encourage joint enterprises, develop industrial production and enlarge the economic base, and to organise contacts and meetings.

Information exchange is fundamental to cooperation for environmental and wildlife protection.

For energy, cooperation between energy companies must be facilitated, as must joint analyses of trade in crude oil, gas and petrol products. Exchanging ideas and information, training and studies are also part of energy cooperation.

Investment must be promoted and protected, particularly through agreements on promotion and protection to improve investment conditions.

In science and technology, research, scientific and technological development, technology transfers and adaptation, links between scientific communities and access to patent databases must all be encouraged.

Trade should be developed and diversified. The parties will study ways of eliminating trade barriers and will open discussions on an agreement aimed at developing trade. A common declaration on this matter follows at the end of the text. Pending agreement, both parties will grant each other the status of most favoured nation, which is the subject of a letter from the Community attached to the agreement.

General and final provisions

A Joint Cooperation Council is set up. It will periodically lay down the general guidelines for cooperation, act as an arbiter in the event of dispute and seek means of putting cooperation into practice. Its decisions are binding on party States, and its presidency is rotated between the EC and the GCC countries. It is assisted by a joint cooperation committee, and may decide to set up further committees.

Parties must exchange information and consult the Joint Council regarding useful information that has a direct incidence on the Agreement, or possible problems in the general functioning of the Agreement or concerning trade.

This Agreement does not prevent the conclusion of bilateral agreements, providing that they do not conflict with this Agreement. Its duration is unlimited, and if one party renounces it in writing, its application will cease six months after the notification date.

For more information about relations between the EC and the GCC, see the GCC page on the DG RELEX website.

REFERENCES

ActEntry into forceDeadline for transposition in the Member StatesOfficial Journal
Council Decision 89/147/EEC01.01.1990-OJ L 54 of 25.02.1989

RELATED ACTS

Commission communication of 22 November 1995 on "improving relations between the European Union and countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council" [COM(1995) 541final - Not published in the Official Journal].

 
Last updated: 04.05.2007
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