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Slovenia

Archives

1) REFERENCES

Commission opinion [COM(97) 2010 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(98) 709 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(99) 512 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2000) 712 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2001) 700 final - SEC(2001) 1755 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2002) 700 final - SEC(2002) 1411 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2003) 675 final - SEC (2003) 1208 - Not published in the Official Journal]
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236 of 23.09.2003]

2) SUMMARY

In its July 1997 opinion, the European Commission concluded that as regards farming legislation, Slovenia still had work to do on alignment with the EU, although significant progress had been made in adopting the measures listed in the 1995 White Paper White Paper on the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Internal Market..

Particular effort was needed in the following areas:

  • improving structural and rural-development policy;
  • enforcing veterinary and phytosanitary rules and upgrading infrastructure to meet EU standards - especially important in the context of inspection and control arrangements at the EU's external borders;
  • strengthening the administrative framework to guarantee the necessary capacity for implementing and enforcing the CAP (Common Agricultural Policy);
  • further restructuring the farming and agri-food sector to boost its competitiveness.

The Commission finished by noting that Slovenia's accession to the European Union should not be a major problem in the medium term as far as implementation of the CAP was concerned, provided the improvements listed above were made. As regards fisheries, the Commission concluded that, with its relatively low output and foreign trade, the Slovenian fisheries sector would not have a significant impact on the EU as a whole.

The November 1998 report called for further efforts from Slovenia to align its farming legislation and reform its farming sector to the CAP and the EU's agri-food standards. The structures necessary for implementing rural and structural policy needed to be put in place as quickly as possible. In the fisheries sector, the report noted a lack of progress.

In its October 1999 report, the Commission concluded that while some progress towards alignment with EU farming legislation had been made, a great deal of work remained in transposing and implementing legislation. No progress had been made in the fisheries sector.

The November 2000 report flagged up significant progress made by Slovenia in both farming and fisheries.

The November 2001 report highlighted the progress made by Slovenia in the farming sector, while underlining that extensive efforts still had to be made.
In fisheries, Slovenia has made progress in its efforts to standardise legislation, adopting a Maritime Code in March 2001. This established a sound legal basis for the monitoring of fishing vessels and the creation of a fishing fleet register. As regards the management, inspection and control of stocks, a Department for Freshwater and Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture had been created within the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food. Also in 2001, the Fisheries Institute was converted into a Fisheries Research Institute, intended in time to be the main source of scientific advice on marine resources.

The November 2002 report highlighted the progress made by Slovenia in aligning its farming legislation and expanding its administrative infrastructure, especially in the veterinary and plant-health fields. In fisheries, progress had been made on both the legislative and the administrative fronts.

The November 2003 report shows that Slovenia has met some of its commitments. With regard to the common organisations of the markets in sugar and milk and certain aspects of the veterinary field, an effort is still required to ensure that everything will be ready and operational on accession. Slovenia has met most of its commitments as regards fisheries.

COMMUNITYACQUIS

The Common Agricultural Policy is designed to maintain and develop a modern farming system that ensures both a fair standard of living for farmers and a supply of food at reasonable prices for consumers, as well as guaranteeing free movement of goods within the EU.

The Europe Agreement, which provides the legal basis for agricultural trade between Poland and the EU, aims to promote cooperation on modernising, restructuring and privatising Poland's farming and agri-food sectors and its plant-health standards. The 1995 White Paper on the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Internal Market covers legislation on veterinary, plant-health and animal-nutrition controls, as well as marketing requirements for individual commodities. The purpose of this legislation is to protect consumers, public health and animal and plant health.

The Common Fisheries Policy covers market-organisation regimes, structural policy, agreements with non-member countries, management and conservation of fish stocks and scientific research in support of these activities.

Trade with the EU in fishery products is covered in the Europe Agreement but not the White Paper.

EVALUATION

Agriculture

Slovenia has met most of its commitments. The rules on the common organisations of the markets in sugar and milk are not totally in line with the acquis. The same holds true for veterinary control systems in the internal market, trade in live animals and livestock products in the veterinary field, the protection of public health and common measures. Unless intense efforts are made in these areas, Slovenia will not be ready in time.

Fisheries

Slovenia has met most of its commitments as regards fisheries. Alignment with the acquis must be completed with regard to the fishing fleet register and the common organisation of the market. Staffing levels must be increased to improve administrative capacity.

 
Last updated: 27.02.2004
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