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Bulgaria

Archives

REFERENCES

Commission Opinion [COM(97) 2008 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(98) 707 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(1999) 501 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2000) 701 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2001) 700 final SEC(2001) 1744 final - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2002) 700 final SEC(2002) 1400 - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2003) 676 final SEC(2003) 1210 - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2004) 657 final - SEC (2004) 1199 - Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2005) 534 final - SEC (2005) 1532 - Not published in the Official Journal]
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 157 of 21.06.05]

SUMMARY

In its Opinion issued in July 1997, the European Commission took the view that Bulgaria's progress in adopting EU legislation had been very limited. Agricultural policy required thorough reform to prepare for the application of the acquis.
The November 1998 Report noted that some progress had been made in meeting the short-term priorities laid down in the accession partnership. Progress had also been made on agricultural prices and duties and non-quantitative restrictions on exports. Further efforts were, however, requested, particularly in land reform.
The October 1999 Report notes that some progress has been made in terms of alignment. It states that difficulties remain regarding implementation, basically due to lack of funding. Further efforts are, however, still needed, particularly in livestock farming and the land market. On fisheries policy, Bulgaria has taken some first steps. It has also signed most UN agreements and conventions relating to the fishery sector and ratified some of them.
The November 2000 Report highlights the significant progress made by Bulgaria on agriculture, especially in the cereals and wine sectors. Nevertheless, private investment remains weak, the land market does not function in a transparent manner and the legislation on the common organisations of the market does not comply with the CAP. Legislative veterinary and plant health measures have been adopted but the technical and human resources devoted to applying them are inadequate. Bulgaria must continue its efforts on fisheries with a view to transposing EU legislation and implementing the common fisheries policy.
The November 2001 Report noted the satisfactory progress made by Bulgaria in aligning its legislation, and the partial accreditation of the Sapard agency by the Commission.
In the fisheries field, the adoption of a Fisheries and Agriculture Act in April 2001 marked a considerable step forward. This was accompanied by considerable improvements in terms of institutional framework and operational effectiveness, with more efficient structures for management, inspection and monitoring of stocks and work on the creation of a fishing vessel register making good progress.
As regards agriculture, the October 2002 Report noted the efforts made by Bulgaria in aligning its legislation and improving its institutions, although the implementation of legislation had not progressed at the same rate. Efforts had been made to adopt and implement the common fisheries policy.
The November 2003 Report showed that Bulgaria had made good progress on horizontal matters but the implementation of market organisations was lagging behind. Progress had been made on rural development and in the veterinary and plant health sectors. Bulgaria had made substantial progress on fisheries since the previous report.
The October 2004 Report reveals the progress that has been made regarding alignment with the Community acquis and improving administrative capacities. Bulgaria has made good progress on horizontal matters such as the implementation of the EAGGF and the development of common market organisations.
The October 2005 Report notes that Bulgaria has respected its commitments and the requirements stemming from the accession negotiations as regards certain horizontal matters. However, further efforts are needed to introduce operational systems and in the veterinary sector. Progress is still needed in the management of fisheries resources and the adoption of legislation on market policy.
The Treaty of Accession was signed on 25 April 2005 and accession took place on 1 January 2007.

COMMUNITYACQUIS

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) aims to maintain and develop a modern agricultural system ensuring a fair standard of living for the agricultural community and a supply of food at reasonable prices for consumers, as well as free movement of goods within the EC.

The Europe Agreement which provides the basis for agricultural trade between Bulgaria and the EU, aims to promote cooperation on modernising, restructuring and privatising Bulgaria's agriculture sector and food industry and its plant health standards. The 1995 White Paper on the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the internal market covers legislation in the fields of veterinary, plant health and animal nutrition controls, as well as marketing requirements for individual commodities. The purpose of such legislation is to protect consumers, public health and the health of animals and plants.

The Common Fisheries Policy includes common market organisations, structural policy, agreements with third countries, management and conservation of fish resources, and scientific research in support of these activities.

The Europe Agreement includes provisions concerning trade in fisheries products with the Union. The White Paper includes no measures in this field.

EVALUATION

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) aims to maintain and develop a modern agricultural system ensuring a fair standard of living for the agricultural community and a supply of food at reasonable prices for consumers, as well as free movement of goods within the EC.

The Europe Agreement, which provides the basis for agricultural trade between Bulgaria and the EU, aims to promote cooperation on modernising, restructuring and privatising Bulgaria's agriculture sector and food industry and its plant health standards. The 1995 White Paper on the countries of central and eastern Europe and the internal market covers legislation in the fields of veterinary, plant health, animal nutrition controls and marketing requirements for individual commodities. The purpose of such legislation is to protect consumers, public health and the health of animals and plants.

The Common Fisheries Policy includes common market organisations, structural policy, agreements with third countries, management and conservation of fish resources, and scientific research in support of these activities.

The Europe Agreement includes provisions concerning trade in fisheries products with the Union. The White Paper includes no measures in this field.

EVALUATION

Agriculture

Bulgaria has provisionally closed negotiations on this chapter and has been granted several transitional arrangements. In general terms, the country respects its obligations and satisfies the requirements that follow from the accession negotiations.

No progress has been made in establishing a paying agency, nor has the relevant legislation yet been adopted. The Integrated Administration and Control System is yet to be introduced.

The structures required for the market organisations have not yet been established. No progress has been made on legislation in the milk sector, although there has been some progress as regards wine, sugar and fruit and vegetables.

Bulgaria has been granted a three-year transitional period for rural development policy. Particular efforts are required in the veterinary sector, especially as regards adoption of the framework law. Urgent efforts are needed to combat animal diseases and to regulate trade in live animals and products of animal origin, public veterinary health and animal welfare.

Fisheries

In general, Bulgaria respects its obligations and satisfies the requirements that follow from the accession negotiations as far as state aids and international fisheries agreements are concerned.

It must however make greater efforts as regards resource and fleet management by consolidating its inspection and control measures, including implementation of the Vessel Monitoring System.

Progress is required on the establishment of the market organisations and provision of the administrative capacity required for the management and monitoring of this sector. Bulgaria has provisionally closed negotiations on this chapter and has not requested any transitional arrangements.

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 
Last updated: 01.02.2006
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