Navigation path

Additional tools

  • Print version
  • Decrease text
  • Increase text

Parenting Young Children

Policy category

Supporting Parenting and Assisting with Childcare

Recommendation Pillars

Enhance family support and the quality of alternative care settings

Countries that have implemented practice

Sweden

Age Groups

Adults (age 20+), Young Children (age 0 to 5)

Target Groups

Children/teenagers with Special Educational Needs (SEN), Children, Parents

Years in Operation

2010  - still operating

Type of Organization Implementing Practice

Private Human Services Organization

Practice Overview

Parenting Young Children (PYC) was developed by the Parenting Research Centre as an education program to help parents with intellectual disability develop skills and confidence in parenting tasks. The skills include basic child care such as feeding, sleeping and safety, and parent–child interactions. PYC is a home-based intensive parent education programme, ideally structured around weekly sessions. Parents are taught to plan stimulating play and learning activities, engaging the child in these activities through positive attention, praise, descriptive statements and modelling. The programme also teaches parents to acquire and maintain skills in childcare, food preparation and handling, meal-time issues, shopping, nutrition, bathing, bedtime and sleeping, personal hygiene, health monitoring, emergency management, safety and living space maintenance.  Since each programme is individually tailored based on parent-driven goals, and as all parents have their own individual learning pace, there is no predetermined session length or number of sessions.

Information drawn from Mikaela Starke, Catherine Wade, Maurice A Feldman, and Robyn Mildon. "Parenting with disabilities: Experiences from implementing a parenting support programme in Sweden."
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities,June 2013, vol. 17 no. 2. pp. 145-156

Sustainability

Transferability

Evidence of Effectiveness

Outcome

Treatment Group

Control Group

Outcomes improved (statistically significant)

Percentage of mothers disagreeing with the statement  “Children should be smacked for persistently bad behavior”

54.4%

24.3%

Percentage of mothers agreeing that “Parents enjoy participating in their child’s games”

100%

84.2%

Rosenberg self-esteem scale - Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement: I do not have much to be proud of

97.4%

76.3%

Percentage of mothers having learnt something during their oldest child’s first year that helped with subsequent children

82.1%

56.7%

Percentage of mothers visiting library on a weekly basis

79%

50%

Percentage of mothers checking homework every night

100%

81.6%

Percentage of children admitted to the hospital because of illness

44.7%

21.1%

Outcomes with no effect

Percentage of subsequent children being breast-fed

24.4%

13.0%

Percentage of children receiving Measles-Mumps-Rubella immunizations

94.7

100

Percentage of children receiving school booster

100

94.6

Percentage of children receiving dental check-ups

89.5%

76.3%

Percentage of children having an accident requiring a visit to the hospital

26.3%

44.7%

Percentage of mothers reading to their child

36%

31.6%

Percentage of children stopping  television by 9 p.m.

97,4%

86.8%

Percentage of children being bullied in school

23.7%

36.8%

Percentage of mothers disagreeing with the statement “Horror videos do not have any effect on children”

84.2%

84.2%

Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement “It is important for parents to know who their children’s friends are”

100%

100%

Percentage of mothers agreeing on the importance for parents to become involved in their child’s schooling

94.7%

94.7%

Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale – Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement:

  • I am a person of worth

97.4%

84.2%

  • I have good qualities

100%

94.7%

  • I do things as well as others

94.7%

92.1%

  • I am satisfied with myself

84.2%

73.7%

  • I have a positive attitude toward myself

86.8%

68.4%

  • I want more respect

52.6%

34.2%

  • I feel useless at times

63.2%

55.3%

  • I feel no good at all

97.4%

86.8%

Issue to consider

Contact Information

Name

 Dr Robyn Mildon

Title

 

Organization

 Parenting Research Centre

Address

 

Phone

 

Email

 rmildon@parentingrc.org.au

Website

Available Resources

Evaluation Details

Bibliography

Date

Cost information

Scale of Implementation

Introductory workshops have been delivered to 120 Swedish professionals, with 50 of these professionals also attending an intensive three-day workshop designed to support them to use the program with high fidelity.

Key Lessons Learned

Study participants found PYC well suited for use in their working environment. Most of them reported the programme to have strengthened their work with parents. The programme was seen as benefiting both the study participants in their work with parents with IDs and these parents themselves, and its structure and content were found to be helpful in several ways

Evaluation References

Mikaela Starke, Catherine Wade, Maurice A Feldman, and Robyn Mildon. "Parenting with disabilities: Experiences from implementing a parenting support programme in Sweden." 
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities,June 2013, vol. 17 no. 2. pp. 145-156