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Maximising Income Project

Policy category

Promoting Families’ Financial Well-being

Recommendation Pillars

1. Access to adequate resources, Improve the responsiveness of health systems to address the needs of disadvantaged children, Provide for adequate living standards through a combination of benefits

Countries that have implemented practice

United Kingdom

Age Groups

Adults (age 20+)

Target Groups

Parents, Low-income Families, Children

Years in Operation

2009  - 2012

Type of Organization Implementing Practice

Private Human Services Organization

Practice Overview

Maximising Income project was developed to support families enrolled in the Home-Start program. Financial hardship is a key factor in the lives of many of the young families that Home-Start supports. The Maximising Income project was set up in response to this and to explore whether some of these families may not be accessing all the welfare benefits and charitable grants available to them. The main tools and services used to support families in the Maximising Income project were an online benefits checker and a grants search. A free, confidential telephone helpline was also used and this provided customised support to undertake benefits checks, grants searches and to provide support for using the online services.
Information drawn from Barrett, Helen, and Elizabeth Young. Working Together to Maximise Income for Families of Young Children: Evaluation Report. September 2011.

Sustainability

Transferability

Evidence of Effectiveness

Outcome

Treatment Group

Control Group

Outcomes improved (statistically significant)

Percentage of mothers disagreeing with the statement  “Children should be smacked for persistently bad behavior”

54.4%

24.3%

Percentage of mothers agreeing that “Parents enjoy participating in their child’s games”

100%

84.2%

Rosenberg self-esteem scale - Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement: I do not have much to be proud of

97.4%

76.3%

Percentage of mothers having learnt something during their oldest child’s first year that helped with subsequent children

82.1%

56.7%

Percentage of mothers visiting library on a weekly basis

79%

50%

Percentage of mothers checking homework every night

100%

81.6%

Percentage of children admitted to the hospital because of illness

44.7%

21.1%

Outcomes with no effect

Percentage of subsequent children being breast-fed

24.4%

13.0%

Percentage of children receiving Measles-Mumps-Rubella immunizations

94.7

100

Percentage of children receiving school booster

100

94.6

Percentage of children receiving dental check-ups

89.5%

76.3%

Percentage of children having an accident requiring a visit to the hospital

26.3%

44.7%

Percentage of mothers reading to their child

36%

31.6%

Percentage of children stopping  television by 9 p.m.

97,4%

86.8%

Percentage of children being bullied in school

23.7%

36.8%

Percentage of mothers disagreeing with the statement “Horror videos do not have any effect on children”

84.2%

84.2%

Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement “It is important for parents to know who their children’s friends are”

100%

100%

Percentage of mothers agreeing on the importance for parents to become involved in their child’s schooling

94.7%

94.7%

Rosenberg’s self-esteem scale – Percentage of mothers agreeing with the statement:

  • I am a person of worth

97.4%

84.2%

  • I have good qualities

100%

94.7%

  • I do things as well as others

94.7%

92.1%

  • I am satisfied with myself

84.2%

73.7%

  • I have a positive attitude toward myself

86.8%

68.4%

  • I want more respect

52.6%

34.2%

  • I feel useless at times

63.2%

55.3%

  • I feel no good at all

97.4%

86.8%

Issue to consider

Contact Information

Name

 Jo McLeish

Title

 Press and Pr Officer

Organization

 Home-Start UK

Address

 

Phone

  0116 2587933

Email

 jmcleish@home-start.org.uk

Website

Available Resources

Evaluation Details

Bibliography

Date

Cost information

Scale of Implementation