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Evidence-Based Practices

This section features practices that have demonstrated their effectiveness through rigorous research.  These practices have been reviewed by a team of experts and summarized in a way that is easy to understand.

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Catch UpĀ® Literacy Choose translations of the previous link 
United Kingdom, 2012

Catch Up®  Literacy is a UK-based, structured, book-based, one-to-one literacy intervention for learners in aged 6 to 14 who experience reading difficulties. Its main objective is to improve word recognition and language comprehension skills for children who have been struggling to learn to read. The intervention is based on providing children who are facing reading challenges with one-to-one (individual support) 15-minute sessions twice a week.
The Catch Up Literacy intervention is divided into four stages. In the first stage, assessments for learning are conducted in order to identify the focus for intervention and thus target it to the needs of the individual child. In the second stage, a book with the appropriate level of difficulty is chosen; the choice is informed by the outcomes of the assessment conducted in stage one.  In the third stage, the child attends two 15-minute individual sessions per week, during which the child reads the chosen book and then undertakes a related writing activity which addresses one of he identified miscues. Finally, in the fourth stage, the child’s progress is continuously monitored to ensure that the intervention keeps on fulfilling the child’s changing needs.


School-based Alcohol Education Programme Choose translations of the previous link 
Germany

The school-based alcohol education was designed to change knowledge, attitudes and intentions toward underage alcohol use and abuse in middle school students.  The programme was implemented in seventh grade classes of students between 12 and 15 years old at 16 secondary schools near Hamburg in the Schleswig-Holstein region of Germany in 2006. The programme consisted of four interactive class lessons, a booklet for students and a booklet for parents.  Teachers participated in a three hour training session about the content of the intervention and the intended delivery structure.  Over a three month period, teachers were to distribute a booklet containing information about alcohol and consequences of alcohol use including violence, dependence, medical and economic effects to students and a booklet containing general information about alcohol, interactions with children and behaving as role models to the students’ parents.  Over the same period, teachers were to teach four class lessons, on the following subjects: legal requirements, advertisement, dealing with peer pressure, and acceptable contexts for alcohol.

 

Last updated: March 2014


Working Families Tax Credit Choose translations of the previous link 
United Kingdom, 1999

Since 1971 the United Kingdom has had a system called the Family Credit, which is
designed to alleviate the tax burden on working families. Policy makers desired
to strengthen the link between this income support and working, as well as to
make the benefit more generous, so in 1999, the Working Families’ Tax Credit
(WFTC) replaced the Family Credit.


TigerKids Choose translations of the previous link 
Germany, 2014

The ‘‘TigerKids’’ intervention programme was developed to enhance regular physical activity and to modify habits of food and drink consumption in preschool children. The objectives of the programme are threefold: a) to increase physical activity games at the Kindergarten setting to at least 30 min/day; b) to replace high energy density snack foods with fresh fruit and vegetables and establish consumption of at least two portions/day of vegetables and fruits as a habit; c) to replace sugared beverages with water or other non-sugared drinks (e.g. non-sugared fruit tea) in the day care and reaching a habitual consumption of not more than one glass/day of sugared drinks and juices.


Smokefree Class Competition Choose translations of the previous link 
Netherlands, Finland, Czech Republic, Switzerland, Norway, Italy, Germany, 1989

The Smokefree Class Competition program began in Finland in 1989 and has been initiated in 22 European countries between 1997 and 2008.  The program gives classes of pupils aged 11-14 years old the choice to become a ‘nonsmoking class’ for six months, in return for being entered in a lottery to win a class trip if at least 90% of the class remains smoke-free in each month of the competition period.  The students monitor and report their own participation on a weekly basis.  In some of the countries they also receive health education lessons about the effects of smoking.  The rules and prizes of the competition vary slightly by country but are generally similar.  The intervention is intended to reduce the number of adolescents who currently smoke or will ever smoke and delay the age at which adolescents become smokers by applying positive reinforcement to nonsmoking, making nonsmoking a popular behavior and adjusting social norms within peer groups.