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In the spotlight

  • Making the European Pillar of Social Rights a reality for Europe's families: mind the gap - Seminar on 27th September 2016

    Making the European Pillar of Social Rights a reality for Europe's families: mind the gap - Seminar on 27th September 2016

    The EU must use the European Pillar of Social Rights as a meaningful process which drives rights-based social policy/service innovation at local, and also serve as a genuine fundamental rights checklist for developing family-friendly EU policies and laws beyond the social policy field. This is a unique opportunity for all social policy stakeholders to rebalance the political agenda of the EU Semester towards an equal focus on inclusion, employment and growth, driven by a strong rights-based social policy agenda for Europe.

    COFACE-Families Europe, representing 25 million families across 23 countries, wishes to actively participate in shaping the future social rights pillar, starting with a half-day reflection seminar in Brussels on 27th September 2016 co-hosted with the European Economic and Social Committee.

  • National Maltese Seminar on the Investing in Children Recommendation, La Valetta, 19 May 2016

    National Maltese Seminar on the Investing in Children Recommendation, La Valetta, 19 May 2016

    Organised by the European Institute of Public Administration, this national seminar aimed at providing training for national and local officials on the European Commission’s recommendation “Investing in Children – breaking the cycle of disadvantage”. As a part of a series of seminars on the topic that aims at providing guidance on the use of EU instruments and recent policy developments as well as promoting the exchange of good practices and fostering effective partnerships among relevant actors, the speakers included European Commission officials as well as researchers from Malta and the UK.

  • The Global Education Monitoring Report

    The Global Education Monitoring Report

    The Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report is an evidence-based annual report published by the United Nations Educational and Scientific Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The report monitors progress towards the education targets of the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) framework and it is the most comprehensive and authoritative review of education globally. With reports published since 2002 the GEM has provided leading policy analysis in the field on topics ranging from inequality, gender in education, literacy and Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC).

  • WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study finds gender and social inequalities affect young people’s health and well-being

    WHO Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study finds gender and social inequalities affect young people’s health and well-being

    The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study is updated every four years and has provided for over 30 years information on the health, well-being, social environment and health behaviour of 11-, 13- and 15-year-old young people. The latest WHO publication on the HBSC study presents findings from the 2013/14 survey which covered the demographic and social influences on the health of almost 220 000 respondents. The survey respondents are from 42 countries and regions located in the WHO European Region and North America. The latest report has a special focus on the effects of gender and socioeconomic status on the health, well-being and development of young people.

  • INNOCENTI Report Card 13 – looking at the impact of inequality on the most disadvantaged children in high income countries

    INNOCENTI Report Card 13 – looking at the impact of inequality on the most disadvantaged children in high income countries

    The UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti - published recently the latest Innocenti Report Card which explores the impact of inequality on the most disadvantaged children in high income countries. The report takes an innovative approach comparing the situation of a child living in a household with a median income to the poorest 10% of children. The report ranks 41 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the European Union (EU) according to how the bottom 10% of children compare against their peers in the middle of the distribution – this is called ‘bottom-end inequality.’

  • New report explores how to improve three interlocked domains - family, work and education – to fight poverty

    New report explores how to improve three interlocked domains - family, work and education – to fight poverty

    A new report by the Brookings Institution and the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research called ‘Opportunity, Responsibility and Security’ pdfexplores how three areas of life and policy-making - family, work and education – are interlocked and must be improved simultaneously to fight child poverty in the US. The report makes concrete suggestions for policy action and changes across all three interlinked areas in order to generate a socio-political environment that provides opportunity and improves the lives of families and their children so that they do not remain mired in poverty.

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